Animal Adoptions Face Ruff Period – Scot Scoop News

Animal adoptions have increased over the past year and a half, but as people return to the frenzy of their normal lives, new pets are no longer the primary focus and animal shelters are filling up to new unwanted animals awaiting an outbreak.

With more time spent at home and away from people, many have turned to furry friends as a source of camaraderie during the pandemic. Shelter workers were thrilled with the demand for animals in 2020, giving homes to a record number of dogs, cats, rabbits and other animals.

“Last year, we adopted 2,000 dogs”, noted Angela Padilla, the founder of Family Dog Rescue in San Francisco. “In all of the previous years we were adopting around 1,200 dogs, so we’ve grown by a huge percentage.”

Because of this demand, it was a feat for many to even find a pet for adoption.

“It was very competitive. Every time we posted a new dog, we got tons of applicants; people practically wrote academic essays on themselves. They showed up at the walk-in shelter, begged to meet the dogs, brought pictures of their homes, all they could to try and get the dog, ”Padilla said. “People would get mad if they didn’t get the particular dog they wanted.”

Many have seen first-hand how difficult it is to have animals. Carlmont sophomore Evan Swanson and his family were among them.

“We had our cat Leo from the Peninsula Humane Society,” Swanson said. “There wasn’t a lot of choice back then because a lot were adopted, but we were happy to have Leo because we had a ton of free time and always wanted a cat.”

I think it’s a great idea to have pets, especially if you’re looking for more emotional support because it’s mutual. You get emotional support from your pet, and in return, you also take care of an animal, especially if you rescued it.

– Tiger Zhou

Those lucky enough to get their hands on a new pet have experienced a huge positive impact from the addition to their lives.

“I felt like COVID had been a rough time,” Stanford student Tiger Zhou said. “I had a dog that we had to put down earlier in the year so I really missed him at home and kind of filled that void by adopting my dog, Nico. I think it’s a great idea to have pets, especially if you’re looking for more emotional support because it’s mutual. You get emotional support from your pet, and in return, you also take care of an animal, especially if you rescued it.

As people return to work and school, their time is no longer available for their pets, which decreases with the demand for adoptions. Animals don’t get the same level of attention as when people were stuck at home.

This return to a busy daily life has led shelter workers to expect an increase in returns to shelters due to owners’ inability to care for their animals, but, according to Padilla, this has not. been a problem.

“Everyone predicted that since all of these animals were getting homes, people would go back to work and dump their dogs. We haven’t seen that happen at all. However, the market for people who want to adopt a dog has slowed down considerably. The year before COVID, we adopted 1,200 dogs. This year we currently have a trend of maybe 950 dogs if we’re lucky. ”

Conversely, others have noticed Padilla’s opposite, noting an influx of animal returns. Katarina Köster, owner of the Bay Area Husky Meetup group on Facebook, has seen an increase in the number of people wanting to rehouse their huskies and using the group as a way to unload their dogs.

“We had to change our group’s rules that dog placement was an option for members. At the start of this year, people were lying about their application questions to join the group, and as soon as they joined, they would come immediately and say, “I can’t take care of my dog ​​anymore. I saw this post from a guy who said he had to go back to work in person and he was out of time for his dog, ”Köster said. “So personally, I have noticed a slight increase in this problem.”

Whether or not returning to work results in more animals returning to shelters and moving, the future of animal adoptions looks bleak.

“It’s very slow, and anyone who wanted to adopt before has had a dog,” said Padilla. “A lot of dogs are being euthanized, and people just aren’t ready to adopt.”


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