Animal Rescue – Owl And Monkey Haven http://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 00:44:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Animal Rescue – Owl And Monkey Haven http://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/ 32 32 Running with the Big Dogs at Warren’s Adoption Event – Macomb Daily https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/running-with-the-big-dogs-at-warrens-adoption-event-macomb-daily/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 22:50:15 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/running-with-the-big-dogs-at-warrens-adoption-event-macomb-daily/ Josh Somppi, a longtime volunteer with I Heart Dogs Rescue & Animal Haven, had a loving heart for all dogs and cats, but especially large breeds and pit bulls in particular. Somppi passed away earlier this month at the age of 37 and on Saturday the Deathless Refuge where he spent much of his time […]]]>

Josh Somppi, a longtime volunteer with I Heart Dogs Rescue & Animal Haven, had a loving heart for all dogs and cats, but especially large breeds and pit bulls in particular. Somppi passed away earlier this month at the age of 37 and on Saturday the Deathless Refuge where he spent much of his time hosted a special adoption event.

Instead of flowers for the funeral home, Somppi’s family asked people to donate to I Heart Dogs on his behalf. The shelter, located on the Groesbeck Freeway in Warren, decided to use this money to offset adoption fees for the larger dogs. The first 12 large breed dogs, or dogs weighing over 25 pounds, and the first seven cats or kittens adopted at the event had their adoption fees waived. Dog adoption fees vary between $ 150 and $ 325; fees for cats range from $ 75 to $ 90. Somppi owned a pit bull and four cats.

Staff and volunteers working at Saturday’s event were visibly moved when they spoke about their deceased colleague.

“Josh did it all,” said I Heart Dogs Events Director Cindy Yankly. “He was funny, kind and hardworking. Anything that was broken or needed fixing, he would bring his tools and take care of it.

Somppi was also a home visiting volunteer who checked the homes of potential adopters to make sure there was a secure fence and the home environment was safe for the dog or cat when they arrived at their new home. .

Vito, a Saffordshie terrier, was very happy to meet people at the I Heart Dogs adoption event on Saturday.Photo by Susan Smiley

“If someone needed to fix a fence, we wouldn’t be surprised to see them at Home Depot buy the supplies at their own expense and go fix the fence so the dog can find a home faster,” Yankly said. . “He went out on pack walks, he did a lot of maintenance at the shelter and he also loved cats and kittens. He was simply priceless and everyone loved him. She was a very special person. “

Yankly and volunteer Judy Hey say large dogs tend to stay at the shelter longer than small dogs and puppies and are generally more difficult to place. Caring for and feeding a larger dog can be expensive, and at times people may fear adopting certain breeds such as Pit Bulls or Rottweilers.

Purdy, a German Shepherd and Terrier mix, poses for the camera at the I Heart Dogs adoption event in honor of a longtime volunteer who died earlier this month.Photo by Susan Smiley

“We post pictures of our puppies and within days they are all recognized,” Yankly said. “It’s the same with small dogs, but big dogs sometimes take longer for volunteers to get to know them better. We all love them, but we spend more time with the bigger dogs.

A stocky pit bull terrier / English Bulldog mix named Chumley clearly wanted to engage with anyone who approached his kennel. Several potential adopters watched him, and about an hour after the start of the one-day event, someone filled out an adoption application for him.

“You can tell he’s just a big mushy guy,” said the potential adopter. “I think he’ll probably be a great couch potato.”

An active border collie mix named Mogwai was walked around by one of the staff at I Heart Dogs, enthusiastically greeting potential adopters. The Staffordshire Terrier, Vito, had his tongue hanging out from one side of his mouth and seemed to smile at anyone walking past his kennel.

The border collie mix, Mogwai, was the unofficial host of Saturday’s big dog adoption event at I Heart Dogs. (Susan Smiley – The Macomb Daily)

“He sees all the other dogs and people and he just wants to run and play with everyone!” Volunteer I Heart Dogs said, trying to calm him down with jerky beef treats.

Judy Hey says I Heart Dogs currently has around 80 dogs at the shelter and 30 in foster homes. Sometimes there are “foster failures” where the person who welcomes the dog really bonds with him and decides to keep him. Dogs are typically at the shelter for two weeks before being posted as available for adoption. This gives staff time to assess the dog and determine if he likes other dogs, cats, children and the type of home he will thrive in.

“Sometimes you have a dog that is a really good dog, but he has to be the only dog ​​in the house,” said Hey, who thinks Somppi would have been delighted to see an event like this focused on placement. big dogs. .

Yankly said that while puppies are certainly adorable, there are some benefits to adopting an adult dog.

“They’re generally quieter and don’t chew on your stuff as much and they might be potty trained, depending on their background,” Yankley said. “They already have their personalities and you know how big they’re going to be. “

I Heart Dogs adoptable dogs and cats can be viewed on Petfinder or by going to iheartdogs.org. Contact the shelter at bark@iheartdogs.org


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Sunday story: Save me – richmondmagazine.com https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/sunday-story-save-me-richmondmagazine-com/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 10:30:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/sunday-story-save-me-richmondmagazine-com/ I met my best friend when he was the victim of a hit and run on a freezing night in November 2019. I was sitting in my house in South Richmond when I heard the crash of metal on flesh and the cry of a wounded and terrified dog. . My husband, dressed for the […]]]>

I met my best friend when he was the victim of a hit and run on a freezing night in November 2019. I was sitting in my house in South Richmond when I heard the crash of metal on flesh and the cry of a wounded and terrified dog. . My husband, dressed for the weather, rushed outside and found the dog curled up in the ditch across our busy street. He called out softly, but the animal took off in an adrenaline-fueled sprint away from the street – his right hind leg hanging needlessly behind him – and was soon out of sight.

Further help came when Animal Care & Control in Richmond (RACC) volunteer, who had seen the accident, pulled over in her car and said she would help get the dog to safety. The chase ended when the dog, now a member of our family named Ferdinand, collapsed in a nearby front yard. The volunteer transported Ferdinand to veterinary centers in Virginia, where he received emergency care paid for by RACC. Miraculously, the crash may have indirectly saved Ferdinand’s life; a surgeon also removed an unsightly growth to make it attractive for adoption, and a biopsy confirmed that the growth was cancerous. We adopted Ferdinand after unsuccessful attempts to find a former owner, during a long process of rehabilitation. Almost two years later, he is healthy and happy.

The tale of Ferdinand is presented in “Rescue in Richmond”, A book photographed and written by Ashley Dobbin Calkins, President of the Richmond Foundation for Animal Care and Control plank. The work features the stories of nearly 170 animal rescues – dogs, cats, a trio of cows and a friendly snake – in the Richmond area, most of them completed by RACC. All sales will benefit the RACC Foundation, a nonprofit organization that raises approximately $ 200,000 per year to cover emergency care for Richmond animals. Municipal funding for the RACC is limited to elective veterinary care and other operating expenses.

“I created the book I wanted to read, a book that focused on uplifting and original stories and filled with images of animals and places around town,” says Dobbin Calkins. “I love to promote rescue, but I really struggle with the heartbreaking stories.”

The stories in the book “promote a different tale than that of … ‘sad municipal shelter’ that scares people to consider a rescue pet,” she adds.

“Rescues in Richmond” highlights the new lives of many rescued animals that have made headlines in local newspapers. Flash, temporarily named Blue Skies during his time at RACC, is one of those famous puppies from Richmond. RACC received a call in January about a dog that had been left in a dumpster at Westover Hills residences. Flash was emaciated and covered in excrement. Her hips were curved down and her feet were splayed out, suggesting constant containment.

Jamie Frye was one of hundreds who reached out to RACC on social media to provide a home for the puppy. His family had suffered the unexpected loss of their dog earlier in January on the birthday of their 6-year-old son and were moved by the story of the stray.

“I didn’t expect to be chosen … when they had hundreds of people [interested in the dog]”said Frye,” but I like to say it was a perfect marriage. “

Christie Chipps Peters, director of RACC, asked Frye and her family to come meet Flash after meeting another family failed to bond. He immediately hugged Frye’s son, then said hello to the rest of the family, and the next steps were clear. He showed a wild and endearing side on his second day with the family, when he started to run quickly in the yard.

“[My son] was like, ‘He’s so fast, we should call him Flash!’ so it stuck, ”says Frye.

Flash is now in charge of the Fryes’ Great Yard in Chesterfield County, and the puppy, estimated at a year and a half, has gained 50 pounds in good health since January. The muscle he developed through regular activity corrected Flash’s stooped posture.

“We are seeing terrible cases of abuse and neglect that could easily harden your heart against humanity,” says Chipps Peters, but “there are thousands of people on our side, helping to restore our faith in it. humanity and save the lives we can. “

Buttercup, the rescue calf brought to the shelter by an RACC officer following reports that she was roaming North Side Richmond in May 2020, will attend the ‘Rescues in Richmond’ launch event with her adoptive family in Blue Bee Cider Saturday, September 25, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Copies of the book are also available online.


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Saginaw County Animal Care and Control discontinues admission due to overcrowding https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/saginaw-county-animal-care-and-control-discontinues-admission-due-to-overcrowding/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 22:31:14 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/saginaw-county-animal-care-and-control-discontinues-admission-due-to-overcrowding/ SAGINAW, MI – Saginaw County Animal Care and Control has temporarily stopped welcoming cats and dogs, due to the capacity of the shelter. “Unfortunately, due to the overwhelming abundance of stray dogs and cats brought to us, as well as those left abandoned throughout the county, we are temporarily closed for hospitality,” the agency published. […]]]>

SAGINAW, MI – Saginaw County Animal Care and Control has temporarily stopped welcoming cats and dogs, due to the capacity of the shelter.

“Unfortunately, due to the overwhelming abundance of stray dogs and cats brought to us, as well as those left abandoned throughout the county, we are temporarily closed for hospitality,” the agency published. on his Facebook page on the morning of Saturday, September 18. .

According to the recommendations of the Michigan Department of Agricultural and Rural Development, the agency located at 1312 Gratiot Ave. should house a maximum of 90 dogs and 32 cats. Currently, the shelter has 135 dogs and 100 cats. Additionally, the shelter has 20 dogs and 12 cats on its welcome list, manager Bonnie Kanicki said.

“The stray dogs are coming all the time,” Kanicki said. “We found four mother bitches in two days in the South County area who were still lactating and who appear to have given birth to puppies in the recent past.”

Duty officers average about 30 calls per weekend, Kanicki said.

Cat adoptions are also temporarily on hiatus as staff work to contain a disease circulating among the felines, Kanicki said. She added that she hopes to resume cat adoptions in about a week.

“We are working diligently on a daily basis to mitigate this circumstance in order to open as quickly as possible,” the agency continued in its Facebook post. “The extreme influx of abandoned, sick, injured, homeless, helpless wanderers (many pregnant women) has been an extreme challenge. Their needs are great.

Kanicki pointed out that even though the shelter is full, the animals are well cared for.

The agency works with local and national rescue organizations to move dogs and cats. A “$ 100 off sale” is also underway for dog adoptions. As part of the sale, dog adoptions are $ 25, which includes spaying, vaccinations and microchipping, Kanicki said.

In mid-October, construction of a massive $ 8.5 million shelter is due to begin in Kochville Township. It should be three times the size of the current installation.

Those interested in volunteering or hosting can submit an application via the agency’s Facebook page. Donations of food, toys and bedding are also accepted and appreciated.

“Thank you for your support as we go through these very long, busy and difficult days ahead,” the agency said on Facebook.

Read more:

Bay County shelter sees spikes in animal surrenders: “It’s been a stressful year”

Saginaw County Animal Shelter Design, Timeline Revealed; current triple installation building measurements

Michigan dog who chewed his own leg garners public support and donations as search for rehab shelter begins


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In pictures: hundreds of animals evacuated from shelters damaged by Hurricane Ida https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/in-pictures-hundreds-of-animals-evacuated-from-shelters-damaged-by-hurricane-ida/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 07:11:38 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/in-pictures-hundreds-of-animals-evacuated-from-shelters-damaged-by-hurricane-ida/ While many Louisiana residents are still without power after the Category 4 hurricane in August, abandoned animals are also suffering. Hurricane-battered animal shelters had to find new homes for their residents following damage from the catastrophic storm. Volunteers load crates of shelter dogs onto a plane bound for Wisconsin on Tuesday, September 7, 2021.Matt Williamson […]]]>

While many Louisiana residents are still without power after the Category 4 hurricane in August, abandoned animals are also suffering.

Hurricane-battered animal shelters had to find new homes for their residents following damage from the catastrophic storm.

Volunteers load crates of shelter dogs onto a plane bound for Wisconsin on Tuesday, September 7, 2021.Matt Williamson / AP

In the aftermath of Hurricane Ida, volunteers from animal shelters in Louisiana and Mississippi partner with Rescue wings, a charity that evacuates pets from at-risk shelters in disaster areas.

Matt Williamson / AP
Dog Juliette is waiting to board a plane to Wisconsin on Tuesday, September 7, 2021.Matt Williamson / AP
Matt Williamson / AP
A volunteer transports Lacy to a plane awaiting transport to Wisconsin at the McComb-Pike County Airport in McComb, Mississippi on Tuesday, September 7, 2021.Matt Williamson / AP

As the United States grapples with the environmental impacts of hurricane Ida, the volunteers focused on rescuing our four-legged friends.

Founded in 2012, Rescue wings is a charitable organization dedicated to the air transport of animals from shelters in areas of environmental disasters.

Association founder Ric Browde told Euronews that in the aftermath of Hurricane Ida they moved 598 pets, including 396 dogs and 202 cats on four flights, with another flight scheduled for later. this week.

Matt Williamson / AP
Volunteers load shelter animals onto a plane at the McComb-Pike County Airport in McComb, Mississippi on Tuesday, September 7, 2021Matt Williamson / AP
Matt Williamson / AP
A volunteer transports Juliette to a plane awaiting transport to Wisconsin on Tuesday, September 7, 2021.Matt Williamson / AP

If you want to contribute to Rescue wingsis work you can do it here.


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Young artist raises funds for animal rescue society https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/young-artist-raises-funds-for-animal-rescue-society/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 20:53:24 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/young-artist-raises-funds-for-animal-rescue-society/ Grade 9 student Emily Armstrong creates digital animal portraits for their owners at $ 20 for each piece ordered. She was looking for a way to do something meaningful in her community. The 13-year-old artist reflected with her mother, Marie, and after some deliberation, decided on a project showcasing Emily’s creative skills. “I had worked […]]]>

Grade 9 student Emily Armstrong creates digital animal portraits for their owners at $ 20 for each piece ordered.

She was looking for a way to do something meaningful in her community. The 13-year-old artist reflected with her mother, Marie, and after some deliberation, decided on a project showcasing Emily’s creative skills.

“I had worked for the Alberta Animal Rescue Crew Society (AARCS) in the past because we did it for a school project,” Emily said. “So that was a good place to start, and then my mom brought up the idea of ​​the commission and it all took off from there.”

DIGITAL PORTRAITS

Rather than using a sketchbook, Emily creates the portraits digitally on her phone through an app. It takes him less than 20 minutes for a portrait.

“Lots of digital art, why it takes so long is because you go through different layers and settings and all that stuff,” Emily said. “But I can do it without thinking because I do it so often, so it’s very easy.”

Grade 9 student Emily Armstrong creates digital portraits of pets on her phone to raise money for the CASLR

Marie says Emily used a few dogs from their friend as examples and the fundraising boomed overnight with commission requests. Many of them started coming through work colleagues of Emily’s parents, but more and more people are learning about them through social media.

“They’re family friends, friends of friends, and they’re usually someone at arm’s length,” Marie said. “Then once their friends see it, there’s just a ripple effect moving through their circles.”

Emily set out to raise $ 500 for the AARCS (www.AARCS.ca) and reached it in just two days. Now she’s looking to raise the bar to $ 1,000. The budding artist even puts his own touch on each portrait.

“Not many people notice it, but in all of my shading and line work and everything, there are little spots that reveal the layer underneath,” Emily said. “So it’s like a ton of different colors in one patch. I also add a watercolor background to all of mine and the way I do the eyes is different because I like not to add the color in a circle. full but just like a swish at the bottom. “

WELL ORGANISED

Emily manages the fundraiser on her own and provides clients with two digital images.

“I give them one with my watermark which is the one I’m posting, and then I give them one with a signature if they ever want to print it or frame it,” Emily said.

“What made me so proud was (Emily’s) organization,” said Marie. “Knowing that she was hanging on to the high-resolution files of each commission to email, that she had created an email address, that she had organized the subject line, the entrepreneurial side got me. actually been very impressive for 13 years old. “

AARCS Executive Director Deanna Thompson is happy that Emily has chosen to help the animals.

“It’s so heartwarming to see these young children raising money to help animals in our community,” said Thompson. “Especially in the present day, it really touches the heart and we are so grateful.”

Thompson says the company relies on donations from the public to help the 600 animals it cares for.

“Medical care is our number one expense here,” said Thompson. “We see everything from mange to disease to fractures, so you name it the majority of our funds go to providing the medical care these animals need to be healthy so they can be. adopted. “

Marie says her daughter still has a lot of responsibilities besides her fundraising efforts.

“She also has her schoolwork and personal art work that she also hopes to tackle,” Marie said. “She has babysitting jobs, she’s a busy girl so we’re going to let her run the ship and make sure it matches her personal goals as well.”

Learn more about Emily’s portraits via her Instagram account @artforaarcs


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Residents of the central coast urged to “clean the shelters” https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/residents-of-the-central-coast-urged-to-clean-the-shelters/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 20:15:03 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/residents-of-the-central-coast-urged-to-clean-the-shelters/ Residents of the central coast are welcome to adopt pets and help ‘clean the shelters’ over the weekend. On Saturday, September 18, the community can join Santa Barbara County Animal Shelters for the event. Her goal is to find a home for every homeless animal across the county. Participating shelters have partnered with television stations […]]]>

Residents of the central coast are welcome to adopt pets and help ‘clean the shelters’ over the weekend.

On Saturday, September 18, the community can join Santa Barbara County Animal Shelters for the event. Her goal is to find a home for every homeless animal across the county.

Participating shelters have partnered with television stations owned by NBCUniversal for the Clear the Shelters event. The event will air on KSBY at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday.

Many shelters offer free adoptions throughout the day. The full-day event will run until 4 p.m. on Saturday.

People interested in adopting pets can choose from cats, dogs, rabbits, and other pets. Prospective adopters can visit shelter websites to see what animals are available.

Participating shelters and important details are below:

  • Santa Barbara County Animal Service offers free adoptions from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., with a lunch break from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. No appointment is necessary.
  • The Animal Shelter Assistance Program offers free adoptions from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The shelter says dates are preferred.
  • Bunnies Urgency Needing Shelter offers free adoptions for rabbits and guinea pigs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., with a lunch break from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. No appointment is necessary.
  • The Santa Barbara Humane Santa Maria Campus offers free adoptions from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • The Santa Ynez Valley Humane Society & Dawg offers regular priced adoptions from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Meetings are preferred.


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Allegations of poor animal care in the Ohio Animal Rescue League are reported to authorities https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/allegations-of-poor-animal-care-in-the-ohio-animal-rescue-league-are-reported-to-authorities/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 01:28:29 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/allegations-of-poor-animal-care-in-the-ohio-animal-rescue-league-are-reported-to-authorities/ BELMONT COUNTY, Ohio (WTRF) – A former humanitarian worker with the Belmont County Animal Rescue League (BCARL) shares her concerns. Jennifer Maas says cats with serious communicable diseases were kept with other healthy cats because no isolation was possible at their center, the former Sunset Motel outside of Morristown, Ohio. She said that in many […]]]>

BELMONT COUNTY, Ohio (WTRF) – A former humanitarian worker with the Belmont County Animal Rescue League (BCARL) shares her concerns.

Jennifer Maas says cats with serious communicable diseases were kept with other healthy cats because no isolation was possible at their center, the former Sunset Motel outside of Morristown, Ohio.

She said that in many cases healthy kittens would get sick and die.

Maas said she began to suspect that sick animals were not receiving their medication as directed.

She said she counted a cat’s pills after giving her the prescribed dose one day, then Maas counted them again after five days off work, and all but one pills were still in the bottle.

She said the dogs were left for such long periods of time in their cages that they developed skin irritations because they couldn’t get away from their own urine and feces.

Maas said recently that after one person at the head of the group was fired, there was no one in charge.

Maas showed images of diapers of cat litter and old dry cat food with towels placed on them, rather than being cleaned and replaced. And she said even towels were only added every three days or so.

Maas said she raised her concerns to BCARL superiors and gave them three weeks notice of her departure.

The next day, she said she received a call from a council member telling her to leave immediately, that she was no longer needed.

“In the past, BCARL has saved animals from bad situations and rehoused them,” she said. “But the level of care has steadily declined now.”

BCARL spokesperson Nathaniel Blake told 7News there was a shortage of staff and volunteers.

He also admitted they were overcrowded with animals, due to the pandemic, but said they were constantly looking for other animal shelters to alleviate their overload, even in the Columbus area.

He denied the claims of improper dosage of the drugs.

And he said he couldn’t talk about staff.

Maas says she delivered a report to the Belmont County Sheriff’s Department.


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Pen Farthing ‘So Happy’ After Animal Rescuers Escape From Afghanistan https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/pen-farthing-so-happy-after-animal-rescuers-escape-from-afghanistan/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 20:44:22 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/pen-farthing-so-happy-after-animal-rescuers-escape-from-afghanistan/ Former Royal Marine Pen Farthing said he was “so happy” that his staff who worked in an animal shelter had left Taliban-ruled Afghanistan. Paul “Pen” Farthing, who was forced to leave his Afghan staff amid chaotic scenes in Kabul last month, called their arrival in Pakistan “absolutely breathtaking” on Saturday. He tweeted that his Operation […]]]>

Former Royal Marine Pen Farthing said he was “so happy” that his staff who worked in an animal shelter had left Taliban-ruled Afghanistan.

Paul “Pen” Farthing, who was forced to leave his Afghan staff amid chaotic scenes in Kabul last month, called their arrival in Pakistan “absolutely breathtaking” on Saturday.

He tweeted that his Operation Ark campaign to bring workers and animals out of the Nowzad shelter in Kabul out of the country was “a complete success.”

Mr Farthing said Nowzad staff are “now safe in Islamabad and in the custody of the British High Commission!” I am so happy right now! “.

He said: “It is absolutely breathtaking. It hasn’t really sunk yet. “

Mr Farthing said he saw photos of the staff after they arrived and the smiles on their faces “tell you everything you need to know”.

Afghan personnel had hand-raised dozens of rescued animals, but were unable to leave during the rushed mass evacuation, with foreign troops withdrawing from the country about two decades after US forces removed militants from power in 2001.

Foreign Minister Dominic Raab tweeted: “Glad the Afghan staff in Nowzad, who have been called in for an evacuation, made it through the Pakistani border today. Our @ukinpakistanstaff is helping them and we look forward to welcoming them to the UK in the coming days. “

Since returning to England in late August, Mr Farthing had been working to help evacuate 68 staff and families at Nowzad Animal Shelter, including 25 children and a newborn, from Afghanistan.

The Operation Ark campaign has sparked controversy, although it received tremendous public support.

Defense Secretary Ben Wallace complained that some of Mr. Farthing’s more militant supporters had “taken too long” from senior commanders.

Mr Farthing also apologized for leaving a curse-laden message for a government aide as he attempted to carry out the evacuation.

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Animal rescue centers make the difference at Texoma https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/animal-rescue-centers-make-the-difference-at-texoma/ Wed, 08 Sep 2021 23:39:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/animal-rescue-centers-make-the-difference-at-texoma/ WICHITA FALLS, Texas (KAUZ) – Two Texoma animal rescue centers anxiously await Texoma Gives on Thursday. Emily’s Legacy Rescue and Katy’s Dog Place Sanctuary Rescue are non-profit organizations that rely on donations to take care of animals. “They’ve been waiting forever for their home forever and they finally got it and we’re like in a […]]]>

WICHITA FALLS, Texas (KAUZ) – Two Texoma animal rescue centers anxiously await Texoma Gives on Thursday. Emily’s Legacy Rescue and Katy’s Dog Place Sanctuary Rescue are non-profit organizations that rely on donations to take care of animals.

“They’ve been waiting forever for their home forever and they finally got it and we’re like in a ball,” said Kimber Hopkins, founder of Emily’s Legacy Rescue.

Hopkins started his non-profit organization in 2008. His superpower saves animals and finds them permanent homes. Katy’s Dog Sanctuary Rescue has a similar mission, with a twist.

“We decided to focus on dogs that are not easily adoptable. Senior dogs, dogs with health problems, ”said Catherine Brooks-Aldrete, founder of Katy’s Dog Sanctuary Rescue.

Aldrete and her husband have housed over 100 dogs, they currently have 44. Hopkins and Aldrete look to Texoma for help to continue caring for their rescued furry friends.

“Nonprofits are suffering. Especially during COVID. Last year we missed out on donations that we would normally have received by not having as many fundraisers as we normally would have had, ”Hopkins said.

Aldrete says it’s more than just financial aid.

“It highlights the problems of unwanted dogs, especially senior dogs and dogs that have nowhere to turn. They still have a lot of life in them, ”said Aldrete.

Hopkins says when adopters take the plunge to adopt an animal …

“They save two lives by adopting. The one they adopted plus the space that opened up for another to be saved. And some people even say theirs because you bond with your pet and he becomes a member of your family and he loves you unconditionally, ”Hopkins added.

Copyright 2021 KAUZ. All rights reserved.


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The founder of the Powys Animal Rescue among the volunteers who helped transport the Pen Farthing dogs https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/the-founder-of-the-powys-animal-rescue-among-the-volunteers-who-helped-transport-the-pen-farthing-dogs/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 15:44:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/the-founder-of-the-powys-animal-rescue-among-the-volunteers-who-helped-transport-the-pen-farthing-dogs/ The founder of an animal rescue center in Wales was among the volunteers who helped transport the cats and dogs from Pen Farthing. Farthing arrived at Heathrow Airport with 173 rescues from his animal charity Nowzad in Kabul, Afghanistan on Sunday August 29, and was greeted by a number of vehicles involved in their transport […]]]>

The founder of an animal rescue center in Wales was among the volunteers who helped transport the cats and dogs from Pen Farthing.

Farthing arrived at Heathrow Airport with 173 rescues from his animal charity Nowzad in Kabul, Afghanistan on Sunday August 29, and was greeted by a number of vehicles involved in their transport to their centers of quarantine.

Among them was the founder of Wales Ape & Monkey Sanctuary, Graham Geran, who had volunteered to pick up some of the dogs for free in a special transport vehicle.

Animal rescue, based in Powys, is on the list of government approved premises and carriers for rabies quarantine in England, Wales or Scotland.



Graham Geran helped transport the dogs

Graham told ITV: “I was up at three in the morning because I was supposed to be at Heathrow by 7:30 am … quarantine center.

There were reportedly around 18 other vehicles involved in transporting the animals.

Speaking about the dogs, Graham said, “They got out of the crate and they jumped on us.

“Street dogs like those in Afghanistan, they are treated very badly … but all dogs want is to be loved.”

Graham also revealed that he had received “numerous phone calls” from people wishing to adopt the animals after finding out he was involved in their transport.

He added to ITV: “People want to adopt the dogs, so they will come out in quarantine and in good homes.

Lorraine Edwards of the Lozzas Lurcher Rescue dog charity, based in Hertford, Hertfordshire, also helped move the Nowzad animals to their facilities.

She told the BBC: “Despite the long journey they are in incredible condition and after four months in quarantine they will receive the wonderful new homes they deserve.”



Graham Geran
Graham Geran

The animals, with an estimated total of around 100 dogs and 70 cats, are in quarantine kennels across the UK, with hundreds seeking adoption – however, their welfare is currently unknown.

A spokesperson for Wales Ape & Monkey Sanctuary has since told TeamDogs: “We only provided transport for some dogs when Pen landed at Heathrow, we took them to a quarantine facility so we don’t know really how they’re doing. ”

A statement from Nowzad said: “Our animals that survived the Nowzad clinic trip to Afghanistan in the UK are now safely in quarantine kennels being treated with DEFRA.”

DEFRA has yet to provide an update on animal welfare.


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