Rescue Center – Owl And Monkey Haven http://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 17:39:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Rescue Center – Owl And Monkey Haven http://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/ 32 32 After decades of service to New Yorkers, Fire Commissioner Daniel A. Nigro announces his retirement https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/after-decades-of-service-to-new-yorkers-fire-commissioner-daniel-a-nigro-announces-his-retirement/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 17:20:25 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/after-decades-of-service-to-new-yorkers-fire-commissioner-daniel-a-nigro-announces-his-retirement/ January 21, 2022 Commissioner Nigro is the fourth longest-serving commissioner in FDNY history, having served for seven decadesThe retirement will take effect on February 16 NEW YORK – New York Fire Department (FDNY) Commissioner Daniel A. Nigro today announced his retirement from the FDNY, effective February 16, 2022. Commissioner Nigro is the fourth-serving Fire Commissioner […]]]>

January 21, 2022

Commissioner Nigro is the fourth longest-serving commissioner in FDNY history, having served for seven decades
The retirement will take effect on February 16

NEW YORK – New York Fire Department (FDNY) Commissioner Daniel A. Nigro today announced his retirement from the FDNY, effective February 16, 2022. Commissioner Nigro is the fourth-serving Fire Commissioner in the history of the FDNY and one of six people to hold every rank in the department.

“Dan and I have had an incredible relationship over our long careers in public service. He is a tireless advocate for New Yorkers and a friend I have leaned on time and time again,” said Mayor Eric Adams. “From overseeing the heroic 9/11 rescue and recovery efforts to leading the FDNY’s unwavering response during the pandemic, Dan has worked tirelessly to protect all New Yorkers. New Yorkers, whether they know it or not, are all safer because of the work he has done and owe him their thanks. Dan defines public service and will be greatly missed by me and the entire department.

“Since the day I raised my right hand 53 years ago and followed my father into the world’s largest fire department, I have been blessed, privileged and truly honored to serve the people of our great city. “, said Fire Commissioner Nigro. “On days of triumphant rescues and during times of unimaginable casualties, FDNY members – our firefighters, EMTs, paramedics, firefighters, fire inspectors and civilian personnel – have always answered the call. They are extraordinary people and deeply committed to protecting the lives and property of all New Yorkers. It has been the honor of a lifetime to serve as a fire marshal. »

In June 2014 Commissioner Nigro was appointed as the 33rd Fire Commissioner. As Fire Marshal, he oversaw the FDNY’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including the longest period of medical calls in New York City history and the creation of a vaccination program for FDNY members, city employees and housebound New Yorkers. During his tenure, the department executed a recruiting campaign that resulted in the most diverse pool of candidates in FDNY history, with more women and people of color now serving as firefighters in New York City than in any time in the department’s 157-year history.

Commissioner Nigro also expanded fire safety awareness efforts, launching programs that installed and distributed more than 250,000 smoke and carbon monoxide alarms throughout the city and continued an unprecedented period of fire safety, 2021 marking the 16th consecutive year with less than 100 fire deaths.

He was commissioned as a firefighter on November 29, 1969, and after graduating from the Fire Academy, was first assigned to Engine Company 21 in Manhattan. Over the next 32 years, he rose through the ranks of the FDNY, serving as a lieutenant in Engine Company 35 in East Harlem, as a captain in Engine Company 8 in Manhattan, and as a battalion commander in Battalion 19 in the Bronx.

From 1988, while at the rank of battalion commander, he held several administrative positions at headquarters, including chief of staff and chief of the Office of Health Services, where he oversaw medical care and the treatment of FDNY members.

After his promotion to assistant chief in 1993, he returned to the field and served in Division 3 in Manhattan. A year later, he was named assistant deputy chief and was instrumental in merging the New York City Health + Hospitals Corporation’s Emergency Medical Service into the FDNY. Following the merger, he became the chief in charge of EMS. In 1997, he was promoted to Chief of Operations, overseeing all operations and training for over 14,000 uniformed firefighters and EMS.

After the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center, he was appointed Chief of Department, following the death of his close friend, Chief Peter J. Ganci, Jr. Commissioner Nigro was responsible for overseeing all operations rescue and recovery at the World Trade Center. Trade Center site, and the start of the department’s unprecedented reconstruction following the deaths of 343 FDNY members. As department head, Commissioner Nigro held the highest uniformed rank, overseeing all major uniformed FDNY offices: operations, training, EMS, communications, and fire prevention. He retired from the department in 2002 and returned in 2014 as a fire marshal.

Commissioner Nigro followed in the footsteps of his father, FDNY Captain Daniel Nigro, who served the department for 33 years. A native of New York, he resides in Queens with his wife, Lynn.

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US announces $83 million in latest round of tribal housing grants https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/us-announces-83-million-in-latest-round-of-tribal-housing-grants/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 18:40:35 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/us-announces-83-million-in-latest-round-of-tribal-housing-grants/ This photo taken on October 8, 2021 and provided by Hattie Keller shows gravel blocks where new housing will be built in the native village of St. Michael in Alaska. The tribe received a grant of over $1 million from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development on Tuesday, January 18, 2022 to help […]]]>

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This photo taken on October 8, 2021 and provided by Hattie Keller shows gravel blocks where new housing will be built in the native village of St. Michael in Alaska. The tribe received a grant of over $1 million from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development on Tuesday, January 18, 2022 to help fund the housing project. (Hattie Keller via AP)

PA

Emergency management officials at the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota have a new building, but they’re operating out of an old jail that’s slated for demolition.

That’s because the new building near a small airport isn’t hooked up to water and sewer, said Lislie Mesteth, who leads the Oglala Sioux Tribe’s solid waste program. A new round of grants announced Tuesday by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development will make those connections and help emergency responders with their new digs.

“They never had enough money to fully build it, so we made small grants here and there,” Mesteth said.

The $3.4 million grant to the Oglala Sioux Tribe is part of a third round of “imminent threat funding” from HUD, using money from the American Rescue Plan Act. The latest infusion – $83 million – will benefit 74 tribes across the country and bring the total amount awarded so far to $209 million distributed among 191 tribes.

“Fortunately, these are historic funding levels in this particular program, and I know we are grateful for that, and I know the tribal communities are, too,” said HUD Deputy Secretary Adrianne Todman. “That’s a good amount of money.”

At least another round of funding is coming with the remaining $71 million, she said.

The tribes eagerly awaited the money to cover cost overruns on existing projects and to start new ones. Tribal officials expected more grants to be released last year and texted, emailed and called each other regularly for updates.

The Native Village of St. Michael, Alaska is facing a housing shortage and wanted to make sure they could start building 26 tiny homes in good weather. The tribe learned on Tuesday that it would get more than $1 million for the project.

“This is one-time funding for the tribes,” said Hattie Keller, housing consultant for the tribe.

The tribe has already built gravel slabs for homes using $1 million in federal virus relief funding. The village has yet to secure additional subsidies for water, sewer and utility poles, Keller said. About 430 people live in the village which has less than 100 houses, she said. Tribal leaders plan to offer the new homes as rent-to-own.

Tribes in Arizona and New Mexico received grants in all three towers for housing, sanitation services, internet access and healthcare facilities, and to help struggling families pay housing and utility bills during the pandemic.

Elsewhere, the Northern Arapaho Tribal Housing Authority in Wyoming will use its $1 million grant to purchase a few mobile medical units to aid in its COVID-19 response. The Round Valley Indian Housing Authority in California will use $1.7 million to renovate homes and develop a food bank. And the Nansemond Indian Nation in Virginia will expand and renovate a community center with its nearly $1 million grant.

Todman acknowledges that the grants will not be enough to meet all the needs of Indian country. She said the budget proposals include increased funding.

HUD typically awards about $70 million annually through its Indian Community Development Block Grant program for competitive grants and $4 million for Imminent Threat Grants. About 200 tribes apply each year, but only about 80 are funded, HUD spokesman Michael Burns said.

All American Rescue Plan Act grant money has been designated as imminent threat, making it available on a first-come, first-served basis. HUD has shifted its approach from awarding grants under the Federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, to releasing as a single batch to distributing in series to give to certain tribes more time to apply.

HUD also increased the maximum amount that could be awarded through American Rescue Plan Act funding by 15% because it was a bigger prize pool and construction costs soared, said Burns. The agency first reviewed applications that were not funded under the CARES Act before taking new applications.

Tribes are required to report to HUD how the money is spent.

Pine Ridge Reservation emergency management officials were using the land outside their new building on Tuesday to make COVID kits. Much of their supplies are stored in shipping containers in the former prison that the US Bureau of Indian Affairs plans to demolish once they move, tribal officials said.

Oglala Sioux Emergency Manager Steve Wilson said tribal officials had worked in the concrete jail for several years, even though she was sentenced. He said the electrical system is outdated and the building is inefficient.

The tribe applied for a HUD grant for water and sewer in the new building in 2020, but did not receive it and was placed on a funding priority list under the American Rescue Plan Act, a- he declared. Construction on the new building began in 2019 but was delayed by flooding and the COVID response, Wilson said.

Finishing work remains to be done as well as work on the computer network.

“Hopefully in the summer we can move everything to this place,” Wilson said.

Mesteth also turned to HUD for funding to restore a well pump in the village of Pine Ridge, connect 30 homes to the water system, repair broken water lines in residents’ homes, and remove Dilapidated mobile homes that pose a health risk, she mentioned. HUD fully funded the applications.

“It’s really meaningful,” she said. “This imminent threat will be good, really good.”

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Briton swept away by wave while trying to rescue dogs found dead in Tonga, brother says https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/briton-swept-away-by-wave-while-trying-to-rescue-dogs-found-dead-in-tonga-brother-says/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 00:11:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/briton-swept-away-by-wave-while-trying-to-rescue-dogs-found-dead-in-tonga-brother-says/ A Briton who disappeared after a huge underwater volcanic eruption rocked Tonga was found dead, his family said, in the first reported death in the Pacific island nation. Angela Glover’s brother, who ran an animal rescue centre, said the 50-year-old died after being swept away by a wave. Nick Eleini said his sister’s body was […]]]>

A Briton who disappeared after a huge underwater volcanic eruption rocked Tonga was found dead, his family said, in the first reported death in the Pacific island nation.

Angela Glover’s brother, who ran an animal rescue centre, said the 50-year-old died after being swept away by a wave. Nick Eleini said his sister’s body was found and her husband James survived, the The BBC reported.

“I understand that this terrible accident happened while they were trying to save their dogs,” Eleini said in a video statement released by Sky News.

angelea-glover.jpg
Angela Glover

Instagram/@ifthegloverfits


Eleini said it was her sister’s dream to live in the South Pacific and “she loved her life there”.

Glover had lived in Tonga since his marriage to James, he said, and they became “very popular with locals and expats”.

“Angela and James loved their life in Tonga and adored the Tongan people. In particular, they loved Tonga’s love of family and Tongan culture,” he said.

Eleini said her sister was “a beautiful woman” who would “walk into a room and just light it up with her presence.”

After they married in 2015 and moved to Tonga, James opened a tattoo parlor and Angela founded the Tonga Animal Welfare Society, says Eleini.

She had “a deep love of dogs” and her organization sheltered and rehabilitated strays before trying to find homes for them, he added.

“The uglier the dog, the more she loved him,” he said. “She loved them all, she was totally devoted to them.”

New Zealand and Australia were able to send military surveillance flights to Tonga Monday to assess the damage.

A towering ash cloud since Saturday’s eruption had prevented previous flights. New Zealand hopes to send essential supplies, including much-needed drinking water, on a military transport plane on Tuesday.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Brentwood News | Town of Brentwood https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/brentwood-news-town-of-brentwood/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 16:56:50 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/brentwood-news-town-of-brentwood/ John Allman celebrated his retirement with the City of Brentwood at an afternoon event at the John P. Holt Brentwood Library on Friday, January 14, 2022. Allman was hired by the City of Brentwood in 1986 as a firefighter . He was promoted twice, earning the rank of Captain of the Brentwood Fire and Rescue […]]]>

John Allman celebrated his retirement with the City of Brentwood at an afternoon event at the John P. Holt Brentwood Library on Friday, January 14, 2022. Allman was hired by the City of Brentwood in 1986 as a firefighter . He was promoted twice, earning the rank of Captain of the Brentwood Fire and Rescue Service. In 1996, while concurrently serving as fire captain, he began overseeing the development of technology systems in city operations. Three years later, in 1999, he officially left the fire department to become the city’s first and only chief technology officer, in more than two decades.

City Manager Kirk Bednar said, “From being a firefighter in the very early days of the fire department’s existence, to single-handedly starting the technology department and leading the implementation and expanding our entire technology footprint here with the City of Brentwood, John’s career in Brentwood has been far-reaching. He has also been the driving force behind many intergovernmental initiatives benefiting all of Williamson County and beyond. His departure means the loss of one of the most important members of our staff, and he will be missed.

Brentwood City Commissioner Anne Dunn, who was unable to attend Friday’s event, echoed those sentiments at Monday’s regular city commission meeting. “I never imagined the scope of what the technology department would be like today. I don’t know if we can ever give it enough credit for how it has developed over the years.

1994 Lifesaving AwardSome of Allman’s greatest accomplishments in Brentwood include starting the technology department, implementing the city’s first email system in 1991, installing a citywide fiber optic network, and managing the technology design of the new 55,000 square foot police headquarters and 911 center. Allman also served as the technical lead for the joint radio system project between Brentwood, Franklin and Williamson County. Other major accomplishments include being the first city in the Southeast to install mobile data laptops in police and fire vehicles. Allman has also repeatedly deployed to disasters to assist with emergency communications and led the city in its cybersecurity efforts. In the fire department, he received two awards. Allman received a lifesaving award for helping save someone’s life and a medical service award in 1994 for another lifesaving rescue. (Photo: Allman is far right, back)

Allman said, “I’m excited to slow down and spend more time with my family, including my kids and grandkids.” He also plans to spend more time at his church helping with audio visual systems and at the Williamson County Emergency Operations Center as a reserve EMA.

Brentwood staff have hired a technology consulting firm to help recruit a new chief technology officer. Sarah VanWormer, of the City of Battle Creek, Michigan, will begin with the City of Brentwood on January 31, 2022. She is an experienced government leader with over twenty years of city IT and GIS experience.

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Cops and firefighters discover the power of GIS in search and rescue exercises at Princess Place Preserve https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/cops-and-firefighters-discover-the-power-of-gis-in-search-and-rescue-exercises-at-princess-place-preserve/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 21:58:40 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/cops-and-firefighters-discover-the-power-of-gis-in-search-and-rescue-exercises-at-princess-place-preserve/ The exercise was based on a simple but destructive scenario: a tornado ripped through a 50-acre area, demolishing some homes, damaging others and killing a 5-year-old boy, although participants were unaware that someone was missing until they discovered the damaged house. Flagler County Fire Rescue personnel joined Flagler County Sheriff’s Deputies, Flagler County Emergency Management, […]]]>

The exercise was based on a simple but destructive scenario: a tornado ripped through a 50-acre area, demolishing some homes, damaging others and killing a 5-year-old boy, although participants were unaware that someone was missing until they discovered the damaged house.

Flagler County Fire Rescue personnel joined Flagler County Sheriff’s Deputies, Flagler County Emergency Management, and County IT and GIS teams this morning and mid-afternoon at Princess Place Preserve for the first joint exercise in more than half a decade. Up to 75 participants were involved at all levels, according to Jonathan Lord of Emergency Management.

The search and rescue exercise had a particular objective: to learn how to use Quick Capture, an ESRI application developed for first responders by GIS (geographic information system) experts to enable responders to map and communicate in time real emergencies, from rescue events to tornadoes and hurricane damage. They can do this from their phones and in a coordinated way, allowing everyone involved in the effort to access the same data, regardless of which agency they are from. The data could be generated by field law enforcement, firefighters, or drones, as was the case today. It can be shared between jurisdictions or agencies, so if, for example, Flagler responders are deployed to another state on a mutual aid mission – as frequently happens – they can log into the app and be essentially on the same wavelength as everyone else in the area, assuming the agencies there are using it.

Map the incident: the path of the tornado is this reddish line.  (© FlaglerLive)
Map the incident: the path of the tornado is this reddish line. Various insignia indicate fires, structural destruction, etc. (© FlaglerLive)

Until now, responders have relied heavily on computer-aided dispatch, or CAD, the communication system that runs through a community’s 911 center and gives every responder in the field access to the same incident response, on electronic devices, in real time. time. But CAD has its limitations: it does not allow imagery or video, nor interface with GIS systems (at least not outside of the 911 center, where GIS plays an important role) that immediately map locations or the addresses.

The app amplifies other remote capabilities: “I could log in today and see, wow, we have a problem in Bay County. I wonder if we can do anything to help,” said Darlene Pardiny, county GIS manager, who played a central role in the Princess Place exercise. “And I do that all the time. I send an e-mail, I will find out who the GIS manager is. I’ll say, Hey, you need everything I got from here. We have helped with forest fires in recent years. We helped with flooding in Michigan. But I don’t leave my office.

In early 2020, the app was used at Waterfront Park in Palm Coast in the search for a missing biker (who has not been found). Deputies used the app to live-track each location they searched, letting them know which grounds not to revisit and allowing authorities to show the victim’s family evidence of the thoroughness of the research. “So when the sheriff’s office went back to the family and said we didn’t find anything, they could confidently say that and show them: this is where we looked,” Pardiny said.

missing person
The missing person, a 5-year-old boy, was mapped on a printed map. (© FlaglerLive)

As she spoke, responders involved in today’s exercise were fanning out on the ground and conducting a tornado damage assessment. (As in all exercises, a dose of imagination was required. Princess Place was the location, but the idea was to imagine a slightly more lived-in environment. The ground had been prepared in advance, with existing structures or even tagged trees for the exercise, so that responders could react to and report on what they saw.In the first moments of the exercise, responders could not know more than the passing of tornado The 911 center received more than 50 calls Dozens of people need medical attention Some houses completely destroyed, others damaged Two elderly people may have suffered strokes There are electrical fires, gas leaks, power outages.

Periodically, there is a so-called “injection” in the exercise, a sort of curveball to which responders must react: a residential house has collapsed, an apartment structure is slightly damaged, another has had a total roof collapse, but no victims are located. Then another “inject”: A little boy has disappeared. At this point, the research component comes into play. During this time, all damaged structures and other items encountered by responders are documented and transformed into visual data, which even then someone like Todd Largacci — the GIS supervisor from the Flagler County Real Estate Appraiser’s office — who was part of the exercise — could begin analyzing. Responders can also document “human interactions”: who is being evacuated, how, what may be needed to effect an evacuation, etc. “Everyone brings something different to the table,” Pardiny said.

The role of each responder is tightly defined to maximize efficiency: “So dropping a point,” Pardiny said, using the terminology of a geographic point recorded by a responder at a given point in the mission, ” attaching a photo, the incident command gets it, they open it, yes: we can’t send anyone, we have to find something else, so when they deploy an asset, they deploy the right one resource the first time and then that person doing that pass just keeps going. They don’t stop to help because they’re not equipped to help. Nikki North, the Sheriff’s Real Time Crime Center supervisor, was doing part of the people present at the incident command center.

Live footage from two drones was also scheduled to be part of the exercise (the county has a squadron of 11 drones in all.) TJ Lyon of the Florida Fire Chief’s Association, who is among those who developed the app and was in the exercise, showed a map of data generated by the app during Hurricane Michael in the Panhandle – a map overlaid with a mosaic of color-coded identification points, each with its own reams of data reported . The Princess Place exercise was expected to generate a similar, albeit smaller-scale, map mid-afternoon when the missing boy was likely found and the teams returned for a debriefing.

“Those are the tools we have to use it with different people trained and using those tools,” Flagler’s chief emergency officer, Jonathan Lord, said just before the exercise began. “It doesn’t matter what their badge says or what their uniform says at the end of the day. They can all come together and help our residents. And it’s very exciting. It is also a learning event, as some people are using some of the tools for the first time. But it’s time to prove that we can coordinate and do things as a team. (The Palm Coast Fire Department did not send firefighters, but all of its firefighters were trained in the use of Quick Capture before.)

“Every deputy is trained in emergency response training,” Sheriff Rick Staly said. “But then we have a specific team, that’s their collateral mission. We don’t have full-time functions like major metropolitan areas. And so it’s targeted training with all the different disciplines that you see here on how we interact, how we communicate. Because you want to do this workout before a tornado hits, before a hurricane hits and be prepared.

The last times Flagler County law enforcement, fire and emergency management held joint drills was in 2014 and 2015, when then-chief emergency management Kevin Guthrie, led a mass exercise to test the hospital’s capabilities and that the sheriff’s office led an active shooter simulation. at Flagler Palm Coast High School.

Damage from Hurricane Michael, as mapped via the app.  (© FlaglerLive)
Damage from Hurricane Michael, as mapped by app responders trained today. (© FlaglerLive)

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Betty White challenges to help animal rescues https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/betty-white-challenges-to-help-animal-rescues/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 03:02:22 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/betty-white-challenges-to-help-animal-rescues/ Betty White with Uggie, the canine star of “The Artist”, as she arrives for her Friars Club Roast 2012. (Charles Sykes / Associated Press) We all have our means to decompress, to escape the daily grind – and in these crazy times, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed on a daily basis. We put on music, […]]]>
Betty White with Uggie, the canine star of “The Artist”, as she arrives for her Friars Club Roast 2012. (Charles Sykes / Associated Press)

We all have our means to decompress, to escape the daily grind – and in these crazy times, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed on a daily basis.

We put on music, do yoga, walk, finish a pint of rocky road, finish a pint of vodka, finish a puzzle, meditate, bake bread, eat bread, breathe.

One of my sure-fire stress relievers is watching reruns of “The Golden Girls,” a 1980s sitcom that remains ubiquitous on multiple cable channels, with episodes playing endlessly. It’s a much better way to fall asleep than my usual dose of nightly news programs.

It’s not the funniest show, certainly not the deepest. But it does have a happy ending, and there’s something to do with a bunch of pals and confidants who sometimes laugh at each other but always end up in the end around hugs, slices of cheesecake every night at night. the kitchen table and St. Olaf’s infinitely ridiculous but serious stories told by Rose, performed by beloved Betty White.

What a final kick in the butt it was when we would lose White on the last day of a terrible year, and weeks away from his 100th birthday.

We’ve lost a lot of icons lately. But I don’t think I’ve seen such an outpouring of love for a woman we’ve never met but felt so well known.

One thing we knew about White was that she loved animals and was a champion of their welfare. Shortly after confirming that her death was not another cruel hoax or odd joke about her “dyeing” her hair (this happened in 2014), the hashtag #BettyWhiteChallenge began popping up on social networks.

The challenge is simple: To honor White, donate to an animal shelter, rescue, or agency on his behalf before January 17, which would have been his centenary. It’s a golden challenge, I think, whether you’re a fan or not.

I have featured a lot of animal charities in this column and consulted many more, so to keep things local I have compiled some of these groups worthy of your donation. Many of them are stressed out due to increasing needs and declining generosity, so consider this stress reliever in the best possible way.

Actress Betty White laughs as an African eagle perches above her head when she visited the Los Angeles Zoo in 2006 to accept an Animal Ambassador Award for her decades of dedication to the humane treatment of animals . (Nick UT / Associated press)

If the money is lacking, there are other ways to donate. Albuquerque Animal Welfare and Bernalillo County Animal Care and Resource Center and other government-run animal services and shelters in towns and counties across the state are still in need of volunteers, blankets and toys, homes for welcome and people willing to adopt a furry friend and confidant.

Unless otherwise noted, the following groups are based in Albuquerque, although their work often extends much further. I have also indicated if these were non-profit organizations (for your tax deduction purposes) where known.

Thank you for being the lover of animals.

• Animal Humane New Mexico – The state’s largest animal welfare agency. Provides shelter, veterinary care, education, adoptions. Non-profit. On Facebook, www.AnimalHumaneNM.org, 505-255-5523.

• Argos, A Shelter Dog Rescue – Foster, rehabilitation, veterinary care, education, adoption for shelter dogs. Non-profit. On Facebook, argosdogrescue.org, argosrescuedogs@gmail.com.

• Daisy Farm Sanctuary – Retirement home for senior dogs and dogs with special needs in the Eastern Mountains. On Facebook, daisyfarmsanctuary@gmail.com.

• East Mountain Pet Alert – Volunteers who help reunite lost pets with their families east of Albuquerque. On Facebook, eastmtpetalert@gmail.com.

• Haven for Hamsters Rescue and Sanctuary – Emergency relief for hamsters and guinea pigs. Rio Rancho. On Facebook, havforhamsters.webs.com, 505-918-7113.

• Kindred Spirits Animal Sanctuary – End-of-life care and hospice for older and unwanted dogs, horses and birds outside of Santa Fe. Non-profit. On Facebook, kindredspiritsnm.org, 505-471-5366.

• NMDog – Volunteer rescue in foster care for chained, mistreated and forgotten dogs. Non-profit. On Facebook, nmdog.org, 505-886-1729.

• Horse Rescue in New Mexico at the Walkin N Circles Ranch – Rehabilitates, recycles and relocates rescued horses that live on a working ranch in Stanley. Non-profit. On Facebook, wncr.org, 505-286-0779.

• Pawsitive Life Rescue of New Mexico – Fosters the homeless, abandoned pets, provides veterinary care, vaccination clinics, grooming and finds homes forever. Non-profit. On Facebook, itsapawsitivelife.com, 505-570-2063.

• Penny Lane Foal Rescue – Care, intensive basic skills training, placement of orphaned and abandoned horses, programs for young people to work with horses. Non-profit. Rio Rancho. On Facebook, pennylanefoals.com, 505-373-3203.

• Pet-A-Bulls – Volunteers carefully select breeds of bullies in shelters for training, veterinary care, and vaccinations to prepare well-behaved dogs for adoption. Non-profit. On Facebook, petabulls.com, 505-316-2089.

• Street Cat Hub – Focuses on improving the lives of feral cats by spaying / neutering them and finding them homes. Non-profit. On Facebook, streetcathub.org, (505) 247-9357 but prefers communication via web page or info@streetcathub.org.

• Sunflower Sanctuary – Country house in the eastern mountains for old, sick and injured animals, from dogs to horses, to live their days. Non-profit. On Facebook, sunflowersanctuary.org, 505-286-6302.

• Tootsie’s Vision – Finds foster and forever homes for blind dogs, provides veterinary care, educates more about pets than they do. Non-profit. On Facebook, tootsiesvision.org, 505-440-3208.

• Long live! New Mexico Rural Animal Rescue – Rescue homeless animals from rural shelters. Non-profit. On Facebook, viva-nm.org, vivapaws@gmail.com.

• Watermelon Mountain Ranch – New Mexico’s largest deathless shelter offers a pet home / adoption, training, dog retreat village, vet care and animal rescue from Molly’s Mercy Missions in shelters in the southwest and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Non-profit. Rio Rancho. On Facebook, wmranch.org, 505-771-0140 but prefer to email wmranchnm1@gmail.com.

• New Mexico Wildlife Rescue – Veterinary and rehabilitative care for orphaned and injured wildlife. Non-profit. On Facebook, Wildliferescuenm.org, 505-344-2500.

UpFront is a front page news and opinion column.


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Warming centers adjust protocols amid outbreak of Omicron cases https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/warming-centers-adjust-protocols-amid-outbreak-of-omicron-cases/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 10:30:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/warming-centers-adjust-protocols-amid-outbreak-of-omicron-cases/ STATELINE (WIFR) – Heated shelters across the Stateline are open for those needing to escape the cold. Everyone is welcome, but one thing is not: COVID. Those who run the centers say they are learning a lot as they enter a new cold season with COVID swirling outside. But they also stress that the rules […]]]>

STATELINE (WIFR) – Heated shelters across the Stateline are open for those needing to escape the cold. Everyone is welcome, but one thing is not: COVID.

Those who run the centers say they are learning a lot as they enter a new cold season with COVID swirling outside. But they also stress that the rules their centers must follow are basically recommended practices for everyone.

Pastor Rebecca White Newgren and Rockford’s SecondFirst Church opened the night cafe on Tuesday. On Wednesday evening, around thirty people showed up looking for a break from the cold. Newgren says the volunteers are working with the Winnebago County health department to keep the virus out.

“We do what everyone else does: masks, distance, temperature measurement, hand sanitizer everywhere, but some people need to be masked and distanced,” says White Newgren.

Patrons of the cafe follow all local health department guidelines, including temperature checks when they arrive, masks, and hand sanitizer stations. Volunteers send anyone with symptoms of COVID to hospital, regardless of their vaccination status. Starting next week, the cafe will offer guests the chance to get vaccinated.

COVID protocols are equally strict at the Rockford Rescue Mission.

“When someone walks into our crisis center, looking for overnight care, they will come in, they will be screened for covid, they will meet a nurse that way, we are protecting everyone in the midst of the pandemic we are living through. always, ”says Abby Finley, Director of Marketing and Communications.

Anyone entering the rescue mission will be placed in a quarantine room where they will be seen by one of the staff at the Hope Clinic. Guests will be screened for COVID to determine if they can either the 24/7 shelter or one of the crisis centers. If someone is showing symptoms, they will be isolated and tested for COVID. Vaccination is not required for guests to use any of the mission’s services, but education is available for those who wish to be vaccinated.

Guests socialize with each other from a safe distance while wearing masks. Guest James Phillips is grateful for the support he receives and feels safe at the mission.

“I wouldn’t have nowhere to go and it’s cold outside… I’m really grateful and the people here are great, you know, they treat you like family as long as you follow the rules and everything. ‘have no problem,’ says Phillips.

The Boone County Health Department is in contact with its Emergency Management Agency (EMA) to ensure masks and social distancing are observed at one of their warming centers. Based on the county’s EMA, the public security building is NOT considered a warm-up center.

To find a warming center in your area, contact your county health department or town hall or town hall or see the list of approved warming centers below:

WINNEBAGO COUNTY

The carpenter’s place

1149 Railway Avenue, Rockford

Mon-Fri 8:15 am – 3:00 pm

Rockford Rescue Mission

715 W. State, Rockford

Crisis center for women / Women and children only

8 am-5pm / 7 days a week

Men’s crisis center

7 a.m. – 7 p.m. / 7 days a week

Or Open 24/7 for people needing overnight shelter

Rockford Apostolic Pentecostal Church

2907 S. 4th St., Rockford

8 pm-6am / 7/7

Second / First Church Overnight Café

318 N. Church St., Rockford

9 p.m.-6 a.m. / 7 days a week (OPEN on 1/4/2022)

STATE APPROVED SITES

Belvidere Oasis / Illinois toll highway

East of Belvidere Toll Plaza on I90

24/7

Copyright 2022 WIFR. All rights reserved.


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La Jolla News Nuggets: Donations for Cancer Essay and the Shiley Eye Institute; price of integrative health; Following https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/la-jolla-news-nuggets-donations-for-cancer-essay-and-the-shiley-eye-institute-price-of-integrative-health-following/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 00:30:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/la-jolla-news-nuggets-donations-for-cancer-essay-and-the-shiley-eye-institute-price-of-integrative-health-following/ Curebound donates $ 476,000 for cancer immunotherapy trial in La Jolla Curebound, a San Diego-based organization that combines Padres Pedal the Cause and the Immunotherapy Foundation in a quest to end cancer, announced a donation of more than $ 476,000 to UC San Diego and the La Jolla Institute for Immunology, thus completing a commitment […]]]>

Curebound donates $ 476,000 for cancer immunotherapy trial in La Jolla

Curebound, a San Diego-based organization that combines Padres Pedal the Cause and the Immunotherapy Foundation in a quest to end cancer, announced a donation of more than $ 476,000 to UC San Diego and the La Jolla Institute for Immunology, thus completing a commitment to a cancer immunotherapy trial initiated by UCSD, LJI and the Immunotherapy Foundation.

The trial studies a form of personalized cancer immunotherapy that has been in development for decades, but is now able to accurately produce individualized treatments due to recent advances in technology. Curebound’s donation will ensure the trial is completed, officials said.

UCSD Receives $ 10 Million Grant to Expand Shiley Eye Institute

Philanthropist Darlene Shiley donated $ 10 million to expand clinical space at Shiley Eye Institute at UC San Diego Health in La Jolla, marking the centre’s 30th anniversary.

The expansion aims to increase patient care capacity and expand research infrastructure.

Shiley – along with her husband, Donald, who died in 2010 – is a longtime supporter of UC San Diego through efforts such as the Shiley-Marcos Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, named in part to honor Darlene’s mother, Dee Marcos.

The initial $ 8 million Donald P. and Darlene V. Shiley Eye Center opened in 1991 under the direction of Dr. Stuart Brown.

Over the years, the Shiley family has donated over $ 10 million for various clinical upgrades, equipment, research and leadership chair funding. Today, the Shiley Eye Institute covers more than 91,000 square feet and includes the Anne F. and Abraham Ratner Children’s Eye Center, the Joan and Irwin Jacobs Retina Center and the Hamilton Glaucoma Center, as well as the future Viterbi Vision Research Center.

La Jolla Academy awards prizes for integrative health research

The La Jolla-based Academy of Integrative Health and Medicine has announced the winners of its annual awards for best integrative health research of the year.

Of the three honored professionals and three students, a third place was awarded to Michelle Sexton, Assistant Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology at UC San Diego, for her research on “Transcriptional Changes in Patients with Chronic Neuropathic Pain: A Study pilot ”.

Submissions were received on a wide variety of topics including naturopathic medicine, chiropractic medicine, holistic nursing, body-mind research, acupuncture, mind and spirit, public health, and policy. related to integrative health and medicine.

SBP names its 10 best research stories of 2021

As COVID-19 continued to dominate health-related headlines in 2021, scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys in La Jolla were making inroads in various areas. On December 30, SBP published a list of its top 10 research-related articles.

No. 1 was “COVID-19: Scientists Identify Human Genes That Fight Infection», Which details a research team that was able to identify specific human genes that control viral infection.

Here is the rest of the top 10:

Historical Society 2022 Jewel Awards open for nominations

La Jolla Historical Society’s Landmark Group is seeking nominations for the 2022 Jewel Awards until Friday, January 14.

Homeowners, architects, builders, historians and members of the public are invited to submit nominations for recently rehabilitated or restored homes or other buildings that preserve the character and charm of La Jolla.

The Jewel Award for Rehabilitation rewards owners whose repairs, modifications or additions to a property adapt it to contemporary use while preserving its historical, cultural or architectural character.

The Jewel Award for Restoration recognizes owners whose updates to a property include preserving or returning to its original architectural form and character, often reflecting a particular period in La Jolla’s history.

The Landmark Group is made up of owners of historically designated homes in La Jolla.

To nominate a property for a Jewel Award 2022, email Meredith Baratz at mybaratz@icloud.com. Alternatively, nomination forms, as well as more information and previous winners, can be found under the ‘Historic La Jolla’ tab at lajollahistory.org.

This year’s winners will be announced in March.

Force in the City arrives at Scripps Park

Strength in the City – an event featuring fitness classes, wellness vendors, and live shows – arrives at Scripps Park in La Jolla from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday, January 16.

Although Strength in the City took place in the parks of San Diego, the 2022 edition will be the first at Scripps Park. Part of the park will be closed for paid events, but organizers have said stages will be no more than 2 feet high and fences will be around 4 feet high.

Another part with vendor stands and activities for children will be open to the public.

The event garnered support last year from the La Jolla Parks & Beaches group and the La Jolla Village Merchants Association.

For tickets and more information visit forcedansthecity.com.

Lifeguard trials scheduled for February

Interested in becoming a lifeguard? The San Diego Fire Department will host trials Feb. 24-26 at Ventura Cove in Mission Bay. Trials should be scheduled two weeks in advance.

Bay and ocean lifeguards perform rescues, administer first aid, warn swimmers of unsafe water conditions, enforce beach regulations and orders, clean and maintain life-saving equipment, operate lifeboats and emergency vehicles, brief the public, keep records, write reports and perform other assigned duties.

Pay starts at $ 17.75 an hour. To be interviewed, applicants must be able to swim 500 meters in 10 minutes.

For more information call (619) 221-8844 or visit sandiego.gov/bealifeguard.

– Compiled by the staff of La Jolla Light ??


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Nevada County residents describe their situation, seven days after winter storm – YubaNet https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/nevada-county-residents-describe-their-situation-seven-days-after-winter-storm-yubanet/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 23:10:36 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/nevada-county-residents-describe-their-situation-seven-days-after-winter-storm-yubanet/ Over 1,200 readers have shared reports on the damage and progress over the past few days. For seven days now, more than 13,500 customers in Nevada County (up from more than 32,000 at the height of the blackouts) have been without power. The majority have little or no heating or water. Communication lines, landlines, and […]]]>

Over 1,200 readers have shared reports on the damage and progress over the past few days. For seven days now, more than 13,500 customers in Nevada County (up from more than 32,000 at the height of the blackouts) have been without power. The majority have little or no heating or water. Communication lines, landlines, and cable / fiber are down, leaving many unable to reach and call 911 for emergencies or 211 for immediate needs. Propane tanks are running out, and so are woodpiles (good news on firewood, read on.)

Red dots are initial reports, blue squares are updates starting January 1, 2022.

In their own words, residents shared what is happening right now.

“Need propane to power the oxygen equipment. They went out on Christmas Day, but it’s getting really low now. in addition it is very cold in our house.”

“We are running out of firewood and the entrance to our front door is also blocked by tree branches. We’re going to work on cutting the branches today, Sunday.

“Our road called Bear TRAP Springs Road is very snowy and we cannot go out to get food.”

“Stuck on day 7 without power with an 84 year old grandmother who is in a wheelchair.”

“Complete for my older sister. No cell. She is challenged by technology. Power lines down. Electrical box and pipes on the house torn off by fallen lines. 100 trees felled, fences felled. ATT fixed down (on the local telephone service only). No way to call 911 or 211 since the first day of the storm. PGE said Jan. 10 for power. The electrician cannot come until the route and road are cleared of snow and have indicated 6 to 8 weeks to assess the damage.

“Outage for a week in the seniors’ quarter. Isolated group of 42 houses on Butterfly Dive and Mayflower off Banner Lava Cap.

“Two people over 80 live in this house. Everything is electric, they have no heating, cannot cook hot food. Over 50 degrees in the house, these people need electricity… ..STAT !!

“No electricity, short of propane, left our house Thursday due to freezing cold, staying at a friend’s house in LWW!” My husband is 91 years old and I am 81 “

“We don’t have a heat source and it’s been 44 in our house for 6 days now.”

“In Forest Springs Mobile Home Park, which is a senior citizen park. On day 7 without electricity. Very difficult and difficult for the elderly. Much without heat. Neighbors helping the neighbors because we did not hear anything from the management of the park. Firefighters / ambulances have been called to our park at least 6 times.
PGE forgot us ?! ”

As always, the neighbors help the neighbors.

“I’m going to her house right away to fill a bunch of 5 gallon jugs with Bitney Springs water to bring her right away before the mob hits Bitney Springs.”

“The neighbors on our street have done an incredible job keeping our street clear of snow and looking after trees in the road or tangled in power lines.”

Thanks to the firefighters for clearing the trees and debris from the power line yesterday. Everyone on the street was able to get out in their cars to stock up and get to work for the first time in days. Thank you to everyone who is connecting resources, looking after phones, checking out people in need, and providing food and shelter. “

“My neighbors and I here at Shady Glen Mobile Home Park really help each other. I shoveled a lot of snow so that people even took off a vehicle so that the gentleman could get his medicine. The young man who works for the park has worked very hard going door to door to check on residents. “

“We tied the power lines out of the way so that the road could be passable. Three families with young children were trapped – (going over 6 days) so…. Now we can go through the power lines and get food, water, gas, whatever we need to be safe. The road is a quarter of a mile long and we only have one shovel. The top has been plowed so I think I have about a tenth of a mile left to shovel.

Damage from felled trees and broken poles in some areas like Alta Sierra is described as “a war zone” or “like a hurricane has passed through”. PG&E has 30 crews and 3 helicopters working to assess and restore power today, with an additional 15 crew arriving tomorrow.

County task force teams, made up of Public Works, Search and Rescue, PG&E, CAL FIRE, and AT&T, were able to verify most of the residents. All county roads are now open, while there are still trees in several places, the roads are passable. Private roads are cleared by contractors hired by the county. Yesterday they focused this effort on areas from Banner to You Bet where private roads were still blocked and residents needed access. Areas off You Bet, Greenhorn, Idaho-Maryland have been completed.

Starting today, residents can collect free firewood at the following locations:

  • Eric Rood Center: 950 Maidu Ave, Nevada City
  • First Baptist Church (night shelter): 1866 Ridge Rd, Grass Valley
  • North San Juan Fire Station 3: 13200 Tyler Foote Rd, Nevada City
  • Peardale Chicago Park Fire Station 57: 18934 Colfax Hwy, Gras Valley
  • Cascade Shores: Next to the general store at 16552 Pasquale Rd, Nevada City
  • Banner Mountain: Location to be determined
  • Washington City Fire Station: 15406 Washington Rd, Washington
  • Alta Sierra Fire Station 89: 11833 Tammy Way, Grass Valley

Perishable food disposal sites:

  • Eric Rood Administration Center – 950 Maidu Avenue, Nevada City (behind the prison)
  • Nevada County Operations Center – 12350 La Barr Meadows, Grass Valley
  • Parc Condon – 544, rue Butler, Grass Valley
  • DeVere Mautino Park – 10609 Alta Street, Grass Valley

Night shelters

First Baptist Church
1866 Ridge Rd, Grass Valley, CA 95945
Supported by the Red Cross

Open Sunday at 5:00 p.m. Service animals allowed. Pets are not allowed.

Understand :

  • Heat
  • Power and charging stations
  • Food
  • Showers

Please call 211 1-833-DIAL211 for more transportation information.

Nevada City Veterans Hall (lower level)
415 North Pine Street, Nevada City, CA 95959
Supported by Sierra Roots

Open until Tuesday morning.

Understand :

  • Heat
  • Power and charging stations
  • Food
  • Beds and blankets

Please call 211 1-833-DIAL211 for more transportation information.

Daytime warming centers (PG&E Community Resource Center)

Madelyn Helling Library
980 Helling Way, Nevada City, California 95959
Supported by PG&E

Open from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Understand :

  • Heat
  • Power and charging stations
  • Snacks, water and ice
  • Beds and blankets
  • Wireless


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Winter storm shuts down Grapevine and causes evacuations https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/winter-storm-shuts-down-grapevine-and-causes-evacuations/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 23:10:18 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/winter-storm-shuts-down-grapevine-and-causes-evacuations/ A slow winter storm hovering over Los Angeles made a mess of conditions Thursday – causing several major roads and highways to be closed, prompting evacuations near scars from forest burns and requiring water rescues, officials said. . At least 50 people had to be rescued from Leo Carrillo Campground in Malibu after heavy rains […]]]>

A slow winter storm hovering over Los Angeles made a mess of conditions Thursday – causing several major roads and highways to be closed, prompting evacuations near scars from forest burns and requiring water rescues, officials said. .

At least 50 people had to be rescued from Leo Carrillo Campground in Malibu after heavy rains sent a torrent of muddy water through the area, according to Los Angeles County Fire Department spokesman Geovanni Sanchez.

Apple Valley resident Keith Elvert, 37, had been camping in the area with his wife, children, parents and niece since Tuesday. When he opened the door to his trailer around 3 a.m., “there was two feet of water leaking outside the trailer pretty quickly,” he said.

“It was pretty scary – there were branches and debris, and it was really muddy brown,” Elvert said. “You are enjoying the power of water at this point.”

The family recovered what they could and evacuated by car to a hotel in Thousand Oaks. They hope to return to the caravan on Friday or Saturday to assess the damage.

Sanchez said all campers had been safely evacuated and no injuries were reported during the flooding.

VIDEO | 00:19

A storm floods a Malibu campsite

Campers are forced to evacuate as flooding floods Leo Carrillo Campground in Malibu.

Meanwhile, the build-up of ice and snow forced authorities to shut down part of the Grapevine in both directions of the 5 Freeway, the California Highway Patrol said.

The CHP and the California Department of Transportation were alerting drivers of long delays in the area. The 5 northbound was closed at Parker Road in Castaic, where the “snow barrier” was opened to allow drivers to turn around.

5 Southbound was closed at Grapevine Road. There is no estimated time to reopen, officials said.

The freeway serves as the main artery for travel within and outside Los Angeles County. State Route 58 through Tehachapi east open as an alternative route.

Mark Carrow and his granddaughter, Ella Glass, stand by a flooded section of the Leo Carrillo Campground

Mark Carrow and his granddaughter, Ella Glass, stand near a flooded section of Leo Carrillo Campground due to a heavy downpour in Malibu. Carrow and her family were camping at the site when the flooding occurred.

(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

Part of the Pacific Coast Highway at Pacific Palisades was also closed due to rocks and debris on Thursday, Caltrans said.

And at Union Station in downtown LA, several inches of water filled at least one hallway early in the morning.

“I don’t live in LA but I travel often and have never seen so much water in the LA River or at a flooded Union Station,” said Parker Day, who captured video of the water in the river. station.

Day said his Amtrak Coast Starlight train was delayed by about 20 minutes due to flooding.

The National Weather Service said soggy conditions are expected to persist throughout the day, with several weather advisories in place in Southland.

“LA County is going to receive fairly persistent rains throughout the day,” said Mike Wofford, meteorologist with the Oxnard National Weather Service. “It varies from light to heavy, light to heavy, and it’s going to be like that for most of the day. ”

A winter storm warning was in effect in the mountains of Ventura and Los Angeles counties as well as in San Bernardino County, including Big Bear and Wrightwood, where authorities warn of difficult travel conditions with significant reductions in visibility.

Flash flood watches are in effect for the burn areas of Lake, Bobcat, Dam and Ranch 2 until 4 p.m. Thursday, with residents being urged to prepare for possible flooding and debris flows.

“There is still heavy rain to come so they need to be vigilant,” Wofford said.

The Los Angeles Fire Department said residents can pick up ready-to-fill sandbags from any neighborhood fire station, with free sand offered at several locations.

Orange County officials also issued voluntary evacuation orders for Silverado Canyon, Williams Canyon and Modjeska Canyon near the Bond burn area, which expired at 1 p.m.

The heaviest rains are expected to fall over a 30-mile strip covering most of the Los Angeles coast and the San Gabriel Valley, where up to 4 inches could fall. The rest of LA County will likely see 1 to 2 inches.

Precipitation will decrease in southern and eastern LA County, officials said. Little or no rain is expected over San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties.

But some LA residents said they’ve seen enough already.

“I live in a part of LA where you walk around everywhere,” said Matthew Olivarez, a Koreatown resident. “I mean, I can go out and do stuff, for sure, but it’s such an inconvenience.”

Olivarez said he couldn’t remember seeing such constant rain before. He usually walked to his supermarket, bank, and nearby train station, so he was more than ready for the dry weather to return.

The winter storm also kept temperatures – which are normally in the 1960s at this time of year – well below average. Officials said several records were broken in the Los Angeles area on Wednesday, when maximum temperatures at six stations capped in the 1950s.

The rain also broke a precipitation record at the Meteorological Service’s office in Oxnard, where 2.72 inches of precipitation on Wednesday broke the daily record of 1.58 inches put on December 29, 1951.

Wofford said the storm moved through the area at a fairly normal rate, but then stopped when it reached Los Angeles.

“Most storms, we have six hours of rain and it’s over, but this particular situation is different,” he said. “The offshore depression isn’t really moving; it’s just a kind of moisture funnel in our area.

The rain also caused the Mulholland highway closure in the Santa Monica Mountains between Las Virgenes Road and Cornell Road, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works said. Heavy mudslides and rockfall have littered the pavement, which maintenance crews will work to remove once the heavy rains subside.

A large amount of mud and debris is also blocking the southbound lane of Malibu Canyon Road north of the tunnel. Drivers are advised to exercise caution and avoid mountain roads during rain.

Angeles Crest Highway from State Route 39 to Big Pines has also been closed due to snow and landslides.

A CalTrans traffic camera shows a closed Autoroute 5 in Lebec.

A CalTrans traffic camera shows a closed Autoroute 5 in Lebec.

(CalTrans)

Southern California was not the only location affected by the storm.

Staggering snowfall crippled much of the Sierra Nevada, with tens of thousands of residents still without electricity as of Thursday morning, according to Pacific Gas and Electric.

Governor Gavin Newsom activated the State Operations Center on Wednesday to monitor storm conditions.

“I strongly encourage all Californians to avoid making the situation worse and to refrain from traveling on mountain roads until conditions improve,” he said.

Interstates 50 and 80, which were closed intermittently this week due to a heavy cover of ice and snow, were only open for essential travel, the California Department of Transportation said, noting that some stations -service run out of fuel and supplies. Snow chains are compulsory.

In one video updateCaltrans director Toks Omishakin urged people not to use the Sierra highways and said there had already been more than $ 22 million in damage from winter storms.

Crews worked around the clock in 12-hour shifts to keep roads passable for essential trips, such as those making critical trips or delivering goods and cargo within the state, he said.

“If this is a trip just to spend time with family and friends, we say stay off the road. The conditions are dangerous, ”he said.

The UC Berkeley Central Sierra Snow Lab at Donner Pass announced on Wednesday that it had received 264 inches of snow since October 1, breaking a 51-year snowfall record of 260 inches from October to December, set in 1970.

Rain in Southern California is expected to extend by Friday, and although New Years Eve may start with a few showers, the start of the New Year is expected to end in a dry place.



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