Rescue Center – Owl And Monkey Haven http://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 12:51:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Rescue Center – Owl And Monkey Haven http://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/ 32 32 Pride Ride cape Sun Valley in a rainbow of colors https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/pride-ride-cape-sun-valley-in-a-rainbow-of-colors/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 12:51:25 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/pride-ride-cape-sun-valley-in-a-rainbow-of-colors/ STORY AND PHOTOS BY KAREN BOSSICK Two sheep from Switzerland’s Valais sporting rainbow colors joined Sun Valley’s first-ever Pride Ride on Saturday. Curly and Lambert wo sported colored crowns above their curved horns as they trotted along the Sun Valley Road bike path, stopping to pose for photos with the dozens of families […]]]>


STORY AND PHOTOS BY KAREN BOSSICK

Two sheep from Switzerland’s Valais sporting rainbow colors joined Sun Valley’s first-ever Pride Ride on Saturday.

Curly and Lambert wo sported colored crowns above their curved horns as they trotted along the Sun Valley Road bike path, stopping to pose for photos with the dozens of families along the way. Then they stopped to watch the draft horses coming at a gallop to come face to face with them.

“I take them out a few times throughout the year,” said Deida Runswick, who runs the animal rescue ranch in Hailey where the sheep reside. “It seemed like a good cause.”











Deida Runswick, Carolyn Gray and Skylar Runswick trotted out Curly and Lambert, who are proud residents of Sky Ranch Animal Rescue Center in Hailey.





More than 50 adults and children showed up for the ride, which went from the Horseman’s Center in Sun Valley to the River Run Lodge and back.

They were led by national mountain bike champion Rebecca Rusch, who established a non-binary category during Rebecca’s Private Idaho gravel race atop Trail Creek Summit last year.

“Rebecca is going fast in the streets today,” Pride Ride organizer Jen Smith said through her megaphone. “And it goes through Ketchum, not Trail Creek.”

Rusch told riders that Rebecca’s Private Idaho and her Be Good Foundation, which uses bicycling to create opportunities for personal discovery and humanitarian service, were thrilled to be part of the first Pride Ride in Sun Valley.








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Stella St. George and Brooke Vagias, seen here with Jenna Vagias and Hawkins Dow, won awards for best decorated bikes and costumes.





“Horse riding is movement. Horseback riding is about community. Horseback riding is for everyone. It’s about using the bike for healing, empowerment and growth,” she said.

Stella St. George and Brooke Vagias won t-shirts and other prizes for affixing rainbow pom poms and crepe paper to their bikes, while wearing a colorful shirt, tights and ribbons in the hair.

Others tied colorful balloons to their bikes and toy carts and waved small rainbow-colored flags as they rode through the streets of Ketchum escorted by two county sheriff‘s cars of Blaine. Many motorists honked their horns, while pedestrians waved and took out their phones to take photos.

One of the participants, who grew up in Burley and has a second home in Sun Valley, was riding a tandem bike with a toddler.








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The Pride Ride included many allies who came out to show their support for the LGBTQ community and diversity.





“It’s great,” he said. “It’s nice to see something like this in Sun Valley.”

“It’s fun to see everyone show up,” added Toni Bogue.

The group enjoyed pina coladas, blue raspberries and bubblegum snow cones from the big yellow Snowie Shaved Ice truck at the end of the ride, while Rusch handed out Miir insulated cans that fund water and sanitation projects. health.

The Pride Ride was the final four-day event of Pride Events at Sun Valley and was one of two events supported by Sun Valley Company.








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Those on the Pride Ride stopped at the River Run Lodge before returning to the Horseman’s Center.





The station’s participation stems from a survey of employees who were asked what would make them feel more included and happier in their jobs, said Bridget Higgins, director of public relations for Sun Valley Company. Employees identified support for the LGBTQ community, women in leadership conferences, and a focus on people with different abilities as among the things they would like to see the company support.

Stella St. George said she loved seeing the contestants dress up.

“It felt good to be part of a group of people united for a purpose,” added Brooke Vagias.




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Coast Guard: Boat collision in Florida, 2 dead, 10 rescued https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/coast-guard-boat-collision-in-florida-2-dead-10-rescued/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 23:01:08 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/coast-guard-boat-collision-in-florida-2-dead-10-rescued/ MIAMI– Two people were killed and 10 others had to be rescued when their boats collided overnight near Key Biscayne, South Florida, according to the US Coast Guard and local authorities. The Coast Guard said a person involved in the collision notified the agency of the accident around 10:30 p.m. Friday night. Two bodies were […]]]>

MIAMI– Two people were killed and 10 others had to be rescued when their boats collided overnight near Key Biscayne, South Florida, according to the US Coast Guard and local authorities.

The Coast Guard said a person involved in the collision notified the agency of the accident around 10:30 p.m. Friday night.

Two bodies were recovered in the ensuing rescue operation, one by the Miami Beach Coast Guard Station and the other by Miami-Dade Fire Rescue, officials said. The Coast Guard said in a statement that one of its crew aboard an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter played a key role in the emergency response.

A lifeguard was also sent to help two seriously injured people, one of whom was transferred to Jackson Memorial Medical Center for treatment. Nine other survivors were sent to another hospital for treatment, authorities said. Their names have not been released.

“On behalf of the Coast Guard and our partner agencies, we would like to offer our deepest condolences to the families and friends who have lost loved ones,” said Lt. Cmdr. Benjamin Tuxhorn, Miami Coast Guard Sector Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator.

He said the Coast Guard and local first responders have worked extensively on search and rescue.

The collision is being investigated by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

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The search for more host families; Young-Williams Animal Center Reaches Critical Capacity https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/the-search-for-more-host-families-young-williams-animal-center-reaches-critical-capacity/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 02:53:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/the-search-for-more-host-families-young-williams-animal-center-reaches-critical-capacity/ Knoxville, Tenn. (WVLT) — It’s no surprise to the staff at Young-Williams Animal Center that it’s reaching critical capacity. “Every kennel, every office space, every corner of this building is full of animals, if we can get them in there they are there,” said Chelcie Bowman, director of foster and rescue placements at Young. -Williams. […]]]>

Knoxville, Tenn. (WVLT) — It’s no surprise to the staff at Young-Williams Animal Center that it’s reaching critical capacity.

“Every kennel, every office space, every corner of this building is full of animals, if we can get them in there they are there,” said Chelcie Bowman, director of foster and rescue placements at Young. -Williams.

Indeed, late spring and early summer was often the time when kittens and puppies were born, which meant their business was booming.

“Everything seems to get better when it gets a little warmer, of course we are completely full of cats and kittens. Our kennels are full at the moment and we also have our pet rescue center which we host for people who are going through tough times,” Bowman said. “So it’s just it’s really crazy right now, so we definitely need adopters to bring these babies home, families of foster to prepare them for adoption and in-house volunteers to keep the madness going.”

The young Williams, to control the influx of animals, requested that more foster families come to temporarily take in some of these new animals, especially the kittens.

“So coming into a foster home, at least they feel a bit more of that home feeling and we learn a bit more about them, even if they go into a foster home for a few days, we get to learn how they are in a house, if they are house trained, how they are around people, if there are other animals, things like that,” Bowman said.

The Fosters were essential in controlling capacity issues like Young Williams currently has.

Huxley McCollum brought in her second foster kitten this year after he felt unwell, a benefit foster families receive.

“I mean, it’s a lot of work and you have to be on your feet all day and you can see their improvement by cheering them on when they come in like a frightened kitten and then when you leave them. They’re super soft and they purr, it’s a great feeling,” McCollum said.

Young-Williams pays for veterinary bills, training and other costs related to animal care.

Currently, there are 350 kittens in foster homes for YWAC, a welcome number as they care for nearly 800 at their Division Street facility alone.

For McCollum, foster care was a way for her to start a future career.

“I’ve always wanted to do veterinary medicine and I’ve loved animals since I was a baby and just wanted to get more involved,” McCollum said.

The Young-Williams Animal Center is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.

YWAC organizes a National Foster a Pet Open day June 25, from 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Copyright 2022 WVLT. All rights reserved.

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Extreme heat adds an extra layer of difficulty to fire rescue training https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/extreme-heat-adds-an-extra-layer-of-difficulty-to-fire-rescue-training/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 09:05:30 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/extreme-heat-adds-an-extra-layer-of-difficulty-to-fire-rescue-training/ Imagine having to carry around 75 pounds of extra weight and the temperature outside is 90 degrees or more. This week, City of Jefferson Fire Department personnel practiced rescuing victims of a burning house. Captain Ryan Carrender said they were grateful to be able to use a house the city had acquired in the 400 […]]]>

Imagine having to carry around 75 pounds of extra weight and the temperature outside is 90 degrees or more.

This week, City of Jefferson Fire Department personnel practiced rescuing victims of a burning house. Captain Ryan Carrender said they were grateful to be able to use a house the city had acquired in the 400 block of Lafayette Street.

“We’re focusing on the basics because we have several new players, and it’s good for the veterans to keep up to date with the right techniques,” Carrender said.

During a drill, a small group of firefighters entered the house and pulled out two training dummies. Doing drills like this allows crews to acclimate to the heat they would face, Carrender added.

“Our cargo hold gear is great at keeping the heat out, but it’s also great at keeping the heat in that we generate,” Carrender said.

Firefighters move in and out of the rotating structure. They go to a place designated on the site as a recovery center.

Temperatures during a structural fire can reach up to 1,200 degrees at the ceiling and 200 to 300 degrees at floor level.

“With our cargo gear and air packs, and depending on how much extra gear we need to bring with us, our excess weight could increase by up to a few hundred pounds,” Carrender said. “We could carry equipment, such as a thermal camera or tools to force open a door, while being on the lookout for potential victims.”

If it was a large structure fire, Carrender said, they would call in more staff and that would help turn more staff around.

“We need to give them time to cool down on a hot day to avoid heat exhaustion,” Carreder said.

While there may be times when it looks like fire crews aren’t responding to many calls for service, Carrender said, people shouldn’t think they’re not busy.

“There are a lot of things that go into our days like this training and the maintenance and cleaning of equipment,” Carrender said. “We are always busy with something.”


Juie Smith/News Tribune. During Monday’s practice, Jefferson City firefighter Mason Smith carries a casualty headfirst down the steps to rescue them in the safest and fastest way possible. Firefighters took part in ongoing training on Monday to try to acclimate to the sweltering heat that is expected to hover over the region for the next week or so.



Photo

Jule Smith/News Tribune. Timothy Bullard, right, and Michael Bainbridge, second right, step outside to refresh and rehydrate after leading a practice run at a vacant house. As part of ongoing training, members of the Jefferson City Fire Department participated in a search and rescue scenario on Monday.


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Covid funding awards open door to improving air quality in schools https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/covid-funding-awards-open-door-to-improving-air-quality-in-schools/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/covid-funding-awards-open-door-to-improving-air-quality-in-schools/ Many American schools were in dire need of upgrades – plagued by leaking pipes, mold and outdated heating systems – long before the covid-19 pandemic drew attention to the importance of indoor ventilation to reduce the spread of infectious diseases. The average American school building is 50 years old, and many schools are over a […]]]>

Many American schools were in dire need of upgrades – plagued by leaking pipes, mold and outdated heating systems – long before the covid-19 pandemic drew attention to the importance of indoor ventilation to reduce the spread of infectious diseases.

The average American school building is 50 years old, and many schools are over a century old.

So, one would assume that school districts across the country would welcome the opportunity created by the billions of dollars in federal covid relief funds available to upgrade heating and cooling systems and improve air quality. and Filtration in K-12 Schools.

But a published report this month, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, most U.S. public schools have made no major investment in improving indoor ventilation and filtration since the pandemic began. Instead, the most frequently reported strategies to improve air circulation and reduce covid risk were particularly low-budget, such as moving classroom activities outside and opening windows and doors, if they are considered safe.

The CDC report, based on a representative sample of public schools nationwide, found that less than 40% had replaced or upgraded their HVAC systems since the pandemic began. Even fewer used high-efficiency particulate filters, or HEPA, in classrooms (28%) or fans to increase the efficiency of having windows open (37%).

Both the CDC and the White House have pointed to indoor ventilation as a powerful weapon in the battle to contain covid. Congress has approved billions of dollars in funding for public and private schools that can be used for a wide range of covid-related responses — such as providing mental health services, face masks, air filters, new HVAC systems, or tutoring for children who have fallen behind.

Among the important funding pots for upgrades: $13 billion for schools in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act of 2020; an additional amount of $54 billion approved in December 2020 for school use; and $122 billion for US bailout schools 2021.

“Improved ventilation helps reduce the spread of covid-19, as well as other infectious diseases such as influenza,” said Catherine Rasberry, branch chief for adolescent and school health at the CDC’s National Center for HIV, viral hepatitis, STDs and tuberculosis prevention. . “Investments made now can lead to lasting improvements in health.”

A wealth of data shows that improving ventilation in schools has benefits far beyond covid. Good indoor air quality is associated with improvements in math and reading; greater ability to concentrate; fewer symptoms of asthma and respiratory diseases; and less absenteeism. Nearly one in 13 American children has asthma, leading to no more missed school days than any other chronic disease.

“If you look at the research, it shows that the literal climate of a school — heat, mold, humidity — directly affects learning,” said Phyllis Jordan, associate director of FutureEd, a think tank at the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University. .

Clean air advocates say the pandemic funding provides a unique opportunity to make the air more breathable for students and staff with allergies and asthma, as well as help schools California and across the drought-stricken West to deal with the growing threat of smoke inhalation from wildfires.

“It’s a big problem for schools,” said Anisa Heming, director of the Center for Green Schools to the US Green Building Council, a nonprofit organization that promotes ways to improve indoor air quality. “We haven’t had this much money from the federal government for school facilities in the last hundred years.”

Yet many school administrators are unaware that federal funding for ventilation improvements is available, according to a survey published in May by the Center for Green Schools. About a quarter of school officials said they did not have the resources to improve ventilation, while another quarter were ‘unsure’ about the availability of funding, according to the investigation.

Even before Covid brought the issue of improved airflow to light, about 36,000 schools needed to update or replace HVAC systems, according to a 2020 report of the Office of Government Accountability.

Most schools don’t even meet minimum air quality standards, according to a 2021 report of the Lancet Covid-19 Commission. A pre-pandemic study of Texas schools found nearly 90% had excessive levels of carbon dioxide, released when people exhale; high concentrations in the air can cause drowsiness, as well as impair concentration and memory.

Baltimore, Philadelphia and Detroit — cities where many older buildings lack air conditioning — all closed schools this spring due to excessive heat. And a year before the covid pandemic hit, schools in states like Alabama, Idaho, MichiganOklahoma, Tennessee and Texas closed due to flu epidemics.

Many schools have been slow to spend relief funds due to the cumbersome process of hiring contractors and obtaining state or federal approval, FutureEd’s Jordan said.

During the first year of the pandemic, many schools assigned custodial staff to wipe down surfaces frequently throughout the day. In Seattle, the district has asked staff members to work overtime to help with this cleanup, said Ian Brown, resource conservation specialist at Seattle Public Schools.

Some school officials say they feel pressured by parents to keep spending money on disposable wipes and cleaning surfaces, even though science has shown the coronavirus spreads widely through the air, according to the Center’s report. for Green Schools. Parents and teachers sometimes place more faith in visible measures like these than in ventilation improvements that are harder to see.

And not all schools have spent federal funding wisely. A 2021 KHN survey found that more than 2,000 schools across the country have used pandemic relief funds to purchase air-purifying devices that use technology that has proven to be ineffective or a potential source of hazardous by-products.

School districts are required to spend at least 20% of US bailout aid for school resumption — such as summer school, teaching materials and teacher salaries — leading some schools to prioritize to those needs before ventilation, Jordan said. But she noted that a FutureEd Analysis school district spending plans indicated that districts intended to spend nearly $10 billion of the last round of funding on ventilation and air filtration in the coming years, budgeting about $400 $ per student.

Schools in Los Angeles, for example, have budgeted $50 million to provide 55,000 commercial-grade portable air purifiers for classroom use. Durham Public Schools in North Carolina is spending $26 million to update ventilation. Schools in St. Joseph, Missouri, plan to spend more than $20 million to replace aging HVAC systems.

In Boston, the school district installed 4,000 air quality sensors in classrooms and offices that can be monitored remotely, allowing facility managers to respond quickly when ventilation suffers.

Albemarle County Public Schools in Virginia, meanwhile, has purchased ‘medical-grade’ air purifiers for isolation rooms in school nurses’ offices, where children with covid symptoms are waiting to be treated. ‘to be taken in hand. These units are equipped with HEPA filtration and interior ultraviolet light to kill germs, and are powerful enough to clean all the air in the isolation rooms every three minutes.

But workable solutions don’t have to be high-tech.

Seattle Public Schools used relatively inexpensive handheld sensors to assess the air quality in every classroom, Brown said. The district then purchased portable air cleaners for classrooms with inadequate ventilation rates.

While replacing a central air system is a major construction project that can easily exceed $1 million per school, quality HEPA purifiers – which have proven effective at suppress coronavirus from the air – run closer to $300-$400.

About 70% of schools have at least inspected their heating and ventilation systems since the pandemic emerged, a key first step to making repairs, according to the CDC.

Engineers in Ann Arbor, Michigan inspected “every mechanical ventilation item in the school district, opening up each unit and inspecting fans, pumps and dampers to make sure they were working properly,” Emile said. Lauzzana, executive director of capital. projects for Ann Arbor public schools.

“It’s just something that school districts don’t normally have the funds to do a deep dive,” Lauzzana said. “It’s unfortunate that it took a pandemic to get us here, but we’re in a much better place with indoor air quality today.”

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Marin supervisors are set to review the $717 million budget https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/marin-supervisors-are-set-to-review-the-717-million-budget/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 17:05:22 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/marin-supervisors-are-set-to-review-the-717-million-budget/ Marin County supervisors are expected to review a proposed budget of $716.6 million for the 2022-23 fiscal year that begins in July, a five percent increase from the current budget. Reflecting increased revenue and a $25 million injection of funding from the American Rescue Plan Act, the proposed budget contains $61 million in new spending, […]]]>

Marin County supervisors are expected to review a proposed budget of $716.6 million for the 2022-23 fiscal year that begins in July, a five percent increase from the current budget.

Reflecting increased revenue and a $25 million injection of funding from the American Rescue Plan Act, the proposed budget contains $61 million in new spending, including $5 million ongoing.

“What’s unique about the proposed budget is that we’re recommending over $50 million in one-time spending,” Marin County Administrator Matthew Hymel told supervisors Tuesday after submitting the spending plan to the advice.

Hymel said the county’s one-time spending over the past few years has typically ranged from $10 million to $15 million. He said $25 million in pandemic relief funds available to the county for the 2022-23 fiscal year was a big reason for the proposed spending increase.

“We also recommend continued spending on high priority areas such as homelessness, sea level rise and emergency preparedness,” Hymel said, referring to the $5 million in ongoing spending. which he recommended.

“We haven’t been in this position very often either in my 17 years here as county administrator,” Hymel said.

Public hearings on the draft budget are scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. on June 20.

Some of the costliest items on Hymel’s list to fund with the $25 million in pandemic funding include: $7 million to help pay for renovations to a building at 1251 S. Eliseo Drive in Larkspur for a Project Homekey project; $5 million to help rehabilitate the Golden Gate Village public housing project in Marin City; $4 million to create a County Service Center in South Marin; $3 million to fight climate change and sea level rise; and $1.5 million to help municipalities manage homeless camps.

Some of the largest expenses that will be covered by the $5 million in ongoing new spending would include: $1.5 million for permanent supportive housing for formerly homeless people; $1 million to revamp the Office of Emergency Services and add staff; $810,000 to create a unit within the administrator’s office to combat sea level rise; and $800,000 to hire more public relations staff.

In a separate action on Tuesday, supervisors authorized the use of $1.9 million in current year savings to create a reserve for future ongoing supportive housing costs.

The remaining $31.1 million in one-time expenses would be funded by savings from the 2021-22 fiscal year, increased local and state tax revenue, and lower retirement costs.

The county expects county assessed property value, which determines property tax revenues, to increase 6.5% in fiscal year 2022-23 and an average of 5.4% over the next four months. years.

The county also expects local sales tax revenue in 2022-23 to be 20 percent higher than the prior year, and state allocations, which are based on revenue from statewide sales tax, will increase by approximately 18%.

The $31 million in one-time allocations would include: $5 million for the County Affordable Housing Trust Fund; $5 million for civic center improvements; $4.25 million for fire facility upgrades; and $3 million for technological improvements.

The county has over $200 million in deferred maintenance at over 40 facilities.

The one-time stipends would also include $500,000 for the local implementation of Gov. Gavin Newsom’s CARE Court, a court-ordered mental health care system for people with psychosis.

“We are concerned about state funding to support this program,” Hymel said. “We anticipate that there could be a real increase in demand for this program.”

Hymel said the county will lobby the state to adequately fund the county to operate the program.

The county expects its retirement costs, which make up nearly 10% of its spending budget, to decline by more than $6 million in the 2022-23 fiscal year. This is due to the extraordinary investment returns of 32% achieved by the Marin County Employees’ Retirement Association in fiscal year 2021.

The returns wiped out the county’s unfunded pension liabilities. The resulting savings will be spread over five years.

The bull market came as the federal government pumped trillions into the economy to offset the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. This year, the stock market has performed poorly.

On Tuesday, the World Bank released a report warning of a global recession, as the United States raises interest rates to control inflation, and the possibility of “stagflation”, a recession combined with the ‘inflation.

Supervisor Stephanie Moulton-Peters asked Hymel: “There’s been a drop in the market, so I’m wondering where this is heading. I’m curious to see the market change, and I consider our retirement picture.

Hymel said the county expects MCERA to experience investment losses this year. He added, however, that these losses would be offset by last year’s gains “as long as the market losses are not as large as the 30% (gains) we had the previous year”.

The county still has $178 million in unfunded retiree health liabilities. Hymel recommends that supervisors use any annual savings resulting from reduced pension payment requirements to accelerate the repayment of these liabilities until they are at least 85% funded.

Supervisor Damon Connolly said he was pleased to see the budget contains $150,000 to support community oversight from the Marin County Sheriff‘s Office.

“We get a lot of inquiries about the status of this,” Connolly said.

Rollie Katz, executive director of the Marin Association of Public Employees, said he was pleased the budget recognized the need to address county employee recruitment and retention as one of the county’s top priorities. Nearly 15% of the county’s approximately 2,400 staffed positions are vacant.

“The reality is you have to pay people more money,” Katz said, “especially in today’s economic climate and especially because of the cost of living in Marin County, or for those who don’t cannot afford to live here, the cost of having to travel long distances.

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Max Scherzer and Erica Scherzer will cover the cost of adopting your big dog https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/max-scherzer-and-erica-scherzer-will-cover-the-cost-of-adopting-your-big-dog/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 16:03:53 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/max-scherzer-and-erica-scherzer-will-cover-the-cost-of-adopting-your-big-dog/ The Scherzers and their rescue dogs at the Humane Rescue Alliance adoption center. Photo courtesy of Humane Rescue Alliance. Max Scherzer and Erica Scherzer will once again cover adoption costs at the Humane Rescue Alliance, this time for puppies over 30 pounds. The couple will pay adoption fees until Friday, June 10. Although Max Scherzer […]]]>

The Scherzers and their rescue dogs at the Humane Rescue Alliance adoption center. Photo courtesy of Humane Rescue Alliance.

Max Scherzer and Erica Scherzer will once again cover adoption costs at the Humane Rescue Alliance, this time for puppies over 30 pounds. The couple will pay adoption fees until Friday, June 10.

Although Max Scherzer left the Nationals two seasons ago for the Los Angeles Dodgers and has since moved to the New York Mets, Erica Scherzer is still a board member of the Humane Rescue Alliance. Last August the couple covered adoption costs for a week and in 2017 they helped make room for the animals who had been displaced in the region after Hurricane Harvey.

Ollie the beagle is available.

The Scherzers’ donation comes at a time when pet adoptions have slowed significantly after three years of the coronavirus pandemic, and many shelters are understaffed, according to a study from the Best Friends Animal Society. In January, the organization reported that 60,000 more dogs were available for adoption than last year.

The Humane Rescue Alliance has about 50 dogs available for adoption, according to a spokesperson. The adoption center is located at 71 Oglethorpe St., North West, and is open for in-person adoption visits from noon to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, and all in-person visits are limited to two people per housework.

Adopters can view available pets and find more information about the Humane Rescue Alliance. website.

Maggie Hicks
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Hawkins County resident remembers being part of astronaut rescue team | Appalachian Highlands https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/hawkins-county-resident-remembers-being-part-of-astronaut-rescue-team-appalachian-highlands/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 11:30:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/hawkins-county-resident-remembers-being-part-of-astronaut-rescue-team-appalachian-highlands/ CHURCH HILL – Bill Killen, 82, has always had a fascination with fire engines and firefighting, but he never thought it would lead him to a 67-year career in the fire service, including time at Kennedy Space Center. Killen grew up in Potomac Heights, Maryland where his love of firefighting began. He joined the Potomac […]]]>

CHURCH HILL – Bill Killen, 82, has always had a fascination with fire engines and firefighting, but he never thought it would lead him to a 67-year career in the fire service, including time at Kennedy Space Center.

Killen grew up in Potomac Heights, Maryland where his love of firefighting began. He joined the Potomac Heights Volunteer Fire Department in March 1956.

“I have been to many fires, motor vehicle accidents, drownings, automobile wrecks, with the Potomac Heights Volunteer Fire Department, and in the summer of 1956 received my very first award,” Killen said.

In 1960, Killen was hired as a trainee firefighter at the Naval Propellant Plant in Indian Head, Maryland.

Killen received extensive Navy training to work as a civilian firefighter, and over the next five years saw himself in several explosive-related fires.

Then, in May 1965, Killen received a job opportunity that provided him with unique experiences.

While visiting his family in Florida, Killen met an old friend who was one of the main engineers in charge of construction at Kennedy Space Center.

“So I drove about an hour to the Space Center, walked in and sat down with the fire chief and talked for about 15 to 20 minutes,” Killen said. “Then he opened his drawer and pulled out some paper and wrote July 19 and handed me an application and on the spot. During that 20 minute period, he decided to hire me on the spot, and I was really surprised.

Killen was hired during the construction of the Space Center, which was 50% complete when he joined. Additionally, as a member of the Kennedy Space Center Fire Department, Killen participated in the mobile transporter emergency fire protection, which carried the rocket to the launch pad.

“There were many opportunities to interact with the astronauts, especially when they were preparing for a mission, as they had to undergo firefighting training just as much as the rest of the Kennedy workforce. Space Center,” Killen said.

During this period, Killen observed many Gemini missions.

Rescue team training

On January 27, 1967, tragedy struck the Kennedy Space Center when the Apollo 1 mission, launched at Cape Kennedy, was aborted due to a fire that killed three astronauts.

“I was on duty when it happened and I also knew Gus Grissom,” Killen said. “I went fishing with him.”

A big change that took place after the fire was to reconfigure the hatch. Apollo 1’s hatch had 16 independent locking mechanisms and to remove the hatch each had to be done individually.

Another change that occurred after the failed Apollo 1 mission was the formation of the Astronaut Rescue Team in 1968.

Out of 120 volunteers, nine members of the Kennedy Space Center Fire Department were selected as members of the astronaut rescue team, including Killen.

The Saturn V rocket’s explosion danger zone was 7,000 feet, and the astronaut rescue team was stationed at about 1,500 to 1,600 feet in M1-13s or armored personnel carriers with four Department of Defense doctors.

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“The interesting thing that I remember about the Apollo 8 mission, besides the excitement of being close to the rocket, was the fact that the vibration was so strong that the armored personnel carrier literally bounced and moved. about two feet,” Killen said.

Three members of the rescue team acted as drivers and the other six members rescued the astronauts. Each member of the team has been trained to be able to do any job.

The team practiced to remove all three astronauts in one minute.

“It was exciting to be [directly] involved in the man-to-moon mission,” Killen said. “I had a lot of fun with it. I really enjoyed that.”

In addition to working as a member of the Astronaut Rescue Team, Killen acted as an astronaut escort for several missions. This involved having a rescuer stay with the astronaut until he reached the launch pad, a suggestion made by Killen.

“During the process, I suggested to the fire chief that since the astronauts needed an escort from the suit room to the van, why don’t we stay with them to the launch pad if they need that kind of coverage,” Killen said. “As a result of that, I got a $10 suggestion reward, and that was a really nice reward in 1972.”

Killen served as an escort for the Apollo 11 mission and said he loved being a part of such a historic moment.

“I am very proud to know that I had the opportunity to be part of a very important historical event that very few people have the opportunity to do,” said Killen. “There were so many people who all deserved and deserve recognition and respect for their contributions to achieving this goal.”

Killen said his favorite thing about the astronaut rescue team was learning about the different components of the rocket.

While at Kennedy Space Center, Killen met several well-known people, including Neil Armstrong, Jimmy Stewart, Jules Bergman, President Lyndon Johnson, Vice President Hubert Humphrey, President Richard Nixon, Vice President Spiro Agnew, and Senator Ted Kennedy.

“I enjoyed being part of the astronaut rescue team,” Killen said. “Yeah, there’s the exhibit, and I’ve had several aunts call me up and say, ‘Hey, I saw you on TV with the astronauts.’ So it was a nice part of the duty, but I liked being part of the rescue team because we knew we had a very difficult and serious mission, and we were ready to do it and ready to carry it out So, I’m really proud to have had the opportunity to be part of this team.

During Killen’s time at the space center, there were 45 men who served on the astronaut rescue team.

In the summer of 1974, Killen left the space center after being fired.

“I decided to leave Kennedy Space Center about four months before I left,” Killen said. “With the launch of Skylab Three crew in February 1974, the Astronaut Rescue Team mission was complete. It was the last manned mission NASA had planned. So I was let go as as a first aider and I went to driver operator and I was driver operator on paper for two days and then I was downgraded to firefighter so they laid off that many people.

In September 1974, Killen became the fire chief for the Lake Barton Fire Control District in Orange County.

In 2019, Killen published “The Story of the Apollo and Skylab Astronaut Rescue Team”.

Although being a member of the astronaut rescue team was a significant moment in Killen’s firefighting career, it was not the end of his journey. Killen continued his substantial career in the fire service working with the United States Navy.

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Spokane Valley begins to decide how to spend the $16 million it received from the US bailout https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/spokane-valley-begins-to-decide-how-to-spend-the-16-million-it-received-from-the-us-bailout/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 02:04:03 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/spokane-valley-begins-to-decide-how-to-spend-the-16-million-it-received-from-the-us-bailout/ Spokane Valley is prioritizing affordable housing, a new facility for a local food bank and sewer infrastructure for its $16 million in federal coronavirus relief funds. “What we’re trying to do here is put money in on a one-time basis that would benefit us, without incurring recurring expenses,” Spokane Valley Councilman Rod Higgins said. The […]]]>

Spokane Valley is prioritizing affordable housing, a new facility for a local food bank and sewer infrastructure for its $16 million in federal coronavirus relief funds.

“What we’re trying to do here is put money in on a one-time basis that would benefit us, without incurring recurring expenses,” Spokane Valley Councilman Rod Higgins said.

The city got the money through the $1.9 trillion stimulus bill passed by Congress in March 2021 to help the country recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.

This is likely a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for Spokane Valley, and on Tuesday the City Council began to seriously decide how to spend its millions.

“I was pleasantly surprised at how well it turned out,” Councilwoman Brandi Peetz said. “We, for the most part, seem to agree on everything.”

Prior to Tuesday’s discussion, the city council had already earmarked $2 million for three purposes.

About $250,000 will cover various U.S. bailout and pandemic-related costs for the city government. About $750,000 will pay for a new sewer line on Buckeye Avenue. The Innovia Foundation will likely receive $1 million for its LaunchNW initiative. Innovia says the project will benefit the local economy by helping more children attend college or trade schools and increasing the area’s workforce.

The city council wants to spend $6 million of the remaining $14 million to buy land, primarily with affordable housing and mental health services in mind.

Spokane Valley may be able to indirectly create more affordable housing by buying land and turning it over to third-party organizations like nonprofits, which often lack the capital to make large land purchases but could put housing up in the field.

“You can’t really come up with a housing plan if you don’t have the secure property underneath,” Councilman Ben Wick said.

Buying a property could also help the city avoid U.S. bailout restrictions.

Local governments must decide how to use their money by the end of 2024 and spend it by the end of 2026. Starting and finishing a construction project within this time frame can be difficult. Buying land would be easier.

Spokane Valley plans to invest $4 million in a new $12.5 million, 15,000 square foot facility for Spokane Valley Partners, a nonprofit social service organization better known as the food bank.

“We can help them get into a new building,” Wick said. “It’s a one-time capital cost, not an ongoing operational cost.”

David Stone, program manager for Spokane Valley Partners, said his organization has outgrown the converted church it uses as warehouse and office space.

Angie Kelleher, director of development and communications at Spokane Valley Partners, said the number of people in need of food has increased over the past year.

From the first quarter of 2021 to the first quarter of 2022, Spokane Valley Partners saw a 30% increase in the number of people needing food, Kelleher said.

“We just kind of exploded beyond what we had already grown as a result of COVID,” she said. “It’s not what we were hoping for.”

Not only would a new facility help Spokane Valley Partners store food, diapers and clothing, but it would also provide more office space.

Spokane Valley Partners shares a building with other nonprofits, including Spokane Neighborhood Action Partners and Catholic Charities. A new facility will help all organizations better integrate under one roof.

This will allow Spokane Valley Partners to increasingly serve as an all-in-one resource center for city residents. Kelleher noted that the nonprofit hopes a mental health support organization can have an office in the new building.

Spokane Valley also prioritizes infrastructure.

Unfortunately for the city council, US bailout dollars cannot be earmarked for road projects. However, water, sewer and broadband projects are eligible.

The city intends to invest $1.4 million in sewer infrastructure, in addition to funds allocated for the Buckeye Avenue project.

About $843,000 is earmarked for the Spokane Valley Police Department. These dollars will be used for technological improvements, such as new cameras and license plate readers.

Some of the money is for the arts. The Spokane Valley Performing Arts Center, a $36 million project, is expected to receive $786,000.

Higgins said the performing arts center could benefit the local economy.

“There’s nothing like it for miles around,” he said. “If we are looking for something that will support our businesses, and in particular our hoteliers, then I think that has a lot of possibilities.”

Mental health assistance and mental health learning support will likely receive $500,000.

Peetz said investing in mental health is essential.

“We have so many people struggling right now,” she said.

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Changing our DNA: “The era of human therapeutic gene editing has arrived” https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/changing-our-dna-the-era-of-human-therapeutic-gene-editing-has-arrived/ Tue, 31 May 2022 17:02:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/changing-our-dna-the-era-of-human-therapeutic-gene-editing-has-arrived/ While Rose spent her short life helping break the stigma attached to a devastating disease, geneticist David Liu dedicated his career to developing ways to alter the genetic code that claimed his life at such a young age. “That a single misspelling in her DNA ended Adalia’s life so soon is a loss to all […]]]>

While Rose spent her short life helping break the stigma attached to a devastating disease, geneticist David Liu dedicated his career to developing ways to alter the genetic code that claimed his life at such a young age.

“That a single misspelling in her DNA ended Adalia’s life so soon is a loss to all of us,” said Liu, professor of chemistry and chemical biology and director of the Merkin Institute of Transformative Technologies. in Healthcare at Harvard University.

“I didn’t have the chance to meet Adelia before she passed away in January. But every progeria patient I’ve met has been warm, charming, articulate and deeply inspiring,” Liu told CNN.

In his Harvard lab, Liu and his team have invented new ways to repair mutated genes that damage DNA less than previous technologies. One of his lab’s innovations is called a basic editor, which he used last year to cure progeria in mice. There are four bases in DNA: adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G) and thymine (T). These form specific pairs: A with T and G with C.

Liu hopes the tool will soon be used in human clinical trials to reverse progeria in humans.

“The base editor goes into the cells of the animal, finds the error that in progeria is a C to a T, and turns the T back to C,” Liu said ahead of his presentation on the subject at the life itself. conference, a health and wellness event presented in partnership with CNN.

“And that’s it. We never go back to the patient – it’s a one-time treatment that permanently corrects the mutation that causes the disease,” said Liu, who is also vice president of faculty at the Broad Institute. from MIT and Harvard. , a biomedical and genomics research center in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Six months after announcing the success of progeria, Liu and scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital announced that they had used basic editors to reverse sickle cell disease in mice.

“The era of human therapeutic gene editing is not just coming. It’s already here,” Liu said.

The advantage of a “nick”

Scientists modify genes using enzymes that have been designed to target a specific DNA sequence, cut out the offending genetic material and insert replacement DNA. For decades, however, known methods of modifying our genetic code have been clumsy, often missing their mark or cutting off too much or too little genetic material.

What is CRISPR and why is it controversial?
The arrival of CRISPR systems in the 1990s and more particularly CRISPR-Cas-9 in 2013 announced a new, more elegant way to edit genes. CRISPR uses what is called guide RNA to bring the Cas-9 enzyme to a more precise location on the DNA strand to make the cut.
After years of verification, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved CRISPR-Cas-9 in 2021 for use in human clinical trials for sickle cell disease. Clinical trials are also underway to test the safety of gene editing in a blood disorder called beta thalassemia, leber congenital amaurosiswhich is a form of inherited childhood blindness, blood cancers leukemia and lymphomatype 1 diabetes and HIV/AIDS, to name a few.
In 2021, researchers reported that they had successfully edited a rare and painful condition called transthyretin amyloidosis in six people with just one treatment. This fatal disease causes a protein called TTR to fold into clumps and attack the heart and nerves. The study, published in augustTTR levels reported in some people decreased by an average of 87% after treatment.
A researcher performs a CRISPR-Cas-9 process at the Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin.

However, like older editing technologies, CRISPR-Cas-9 cuts both DNA strands, which has some drawbacks, Liu said. For one thing, some cells rolled back edits after they were made, he said, “so the overall editing efficiency was very low.”

Liu’s team found that if you cut just one strand of the DNA double helix with CRISPR-based technology and “cut” the other, the cell was more likely to implement the corresponding change. on the second strand without complaining – and with fewer mistakes.

Editing larger DNA sequences

Liu and his team also invented another type of CRISPR-based tool called a master editor, which could make larger and more complex edits to DNA than basic editors could not.

Unethical experiments' painful contributions to medicine today
In tests using lab-grown human cells, Liu’s team used master editing to fix the genes responsible for Tay-Sachs disease, a fatal neurological disorder that attacks in the first months of life. Children with Tay-Sachs usually die a few years after symptoms start.

“An analogy I like to use is that the original CRISPR-Cas_9 is like scissors that cut DNA. Core editors are like pencils that precisely correct letters by changing them to one of four different letters” , explained Liu. “And master editors are like molecular word processors that do true search and replace of larger sequences.”

Only a third of the 75,000 known “spelling mistakes” that cause genetic diseases can be corrected by grassroots editors, Liu said. “But add our primary editor, and in between, they can finally free us from the vast majority of misspellings in our DNA,” he said.

“We have to make sure that all of these different technologies go through clinical trials very carefully,” Liu added. “But if they prove to be safe and effective, then one could imagine treating not only the rare misspellings that cause serious genetic diseases, but perhaps even treating genetic variants that we know contribute to many terrible diseases like Alzheimer’s disease or hypercholesterolemia.”

In a 2019 blog postformer National Institutes of Health director Dr. Francis Collins called master editing “groundbreaking”, saying that Liu and his team had “used their new system to insert new DNA segments up to 44 letters and to delete segments of at least 80 letters”.

However, Collins added, “It’s unclear whether master editing can insert or delete DNA the size of complete genes – which can contain up to 2.4 million letters.”

Scientists have unlocked the vitamin D potential of tomatoes, study finds

Gene editing will not be a solution for all of life’s diseases, Liu warned. For example, infections and cancer cells are two areas that are not well suited for gene editing, as you would have to touch every cell to stop the disease.

“But with many genetic diseases, we often only need to modify 20% or 30% of the tissues to save the genetic disease,” Liu said. “That’s what we’ve seen with progeria and sickle cell disease in mice. A little editing can go a long way to saving these diseases in animals, and we’re thinking about humans too.”

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly attributed Liu’s comments as made during the Life Itself conference. They were from an interview.

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