Rescue Volunteer – Owl And Monkey Haven http://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 00:02:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Rescue Volunteer – Owl And Monkey Haven http://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/ 32 32 Corrales thrift store that funds animal rescue needs saving https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/corrales-thrift-store-that-funds-animal-rescue-needs-saving/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 00:02:22 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/corrales-thrift-store-that-funds-animal-rescue-needs-saving/ Volunteer Carron Hardin, left, and store worker Gabby Ruth at work at Secondhand Treasures in Corrales. “It’s the best job I’ve ever had,” Ruth said. The store may close, but “it’s not a bankrupt business”. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal) CORRALES – LouAnn Jordan recalls the time a man walked into Secondhand Treasures, the Corrales Road […]]]>
Volunteer Carron Hardin, left, and store worker Gabby Ruth at work at Secondhand Treasures in Corrales. “It’s the best job I’ve ever had,” Ruth said. The store may close, but “it’s not a bankrupt business”. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal)

CORRALES – LouAnn Jordan recalls the time a man walked into Secondhand Treasures, the Corrales Road thrift store, and discovered a didgeridoo, an Australian Aboriginal wind instrument played by vibrating the lips to produce a strange drone , almost from another world.

“The gentleman knew how to play those horns,” said Jordan, a thrift store volunteer. “He played it, then he turned around and bought it.”

So what are the chances that a Corrales customer knows how to play an exotic instrument from Down Under?

It does not matter. What are the chances that a store in Corrales has such an instrument among its merchandise?

At Secondhand Treasures, where you can buy everything from a platter of antique deviled eggs to a brightly painted papier-mâché duck, the odds might be better than you think.

“You’re journeying through a little treasure you didn’t know you needed – scarves, handbags, shirts and dresses,” said dedicated customer Debbie Haycraft. “I love the jewelry table that makes cute little gifts because (the jewelry) is so reasonably priced.”

Items sold at the store are donated by the public.

Store volunteer Carron Hardin said her husband had made a rule that if she bought anything at the store, she had to give something to him. She doesn’t pay attention to the rule.

“But when it comes to donations, if you’re into sustainability, like we all have to be, instead of the landfill, you can take things to this store, a place where somebody walks in and it’s best thing they’ve ever seen,” Hardin said. “And in the end, 100% of the proceeds go to animals in need, and that really breaks my heart.”

Secondhand Treasures, open noon to 4 p.m. Friday through Sunday, is operated by Southwest Animal Rescue Fund Inc., a nonprofit organization whose mission is to help animals, primarily dogs, in need.

“Anything that helps animals is worthwhile. It’s the right thing to do,” Haycraft said. “There are always people in this store. There is usually a rescue dog running around or behind the counter. I am disappointed that they are not open every day.

The fact is, however, that Secondhand Treasures might not be open for much longer.

great resource

Nancy Baumgardner, president of the Southwest Animal Rescue Fund and director of Secondhand Treasures, sits among the store’s eclectic, often stylish, sometimes eccentric inventory. Usually, it’s a cheerful setting that buzzes with a positive vibe.

But that day, Baumgardner is disturbed by the noise made by men putting up a sign in the parking lot of the store. The sign indicates that the property is for sale.

The owners are selling the building and the land it sits on for more than SWARF, which leases the space, can afford to pay.

“It’s pretty much inevitable that we have to shut down,” Baumgardner said. “We looked at every property up and down Corrales Road and found nothing.” She said the company needed a site of at least 3,000 square feet.

The building that now houses it, the original site of the Frontier Mart community grocery store and later the Bunkhouse furniture company, measures 3,500 square feet.

“We want to stay in Corrales,” Baumgardner said. “It’s a destination area. We get regular visitors during the Balloon Fiesta (Albuquerque International).”

But it is also a central point of the village.

“It’s a place where anyone can donate their stuff, a place where people can meet friends and neighbors,” she said.

Customer Abby Dix buys glassware, “beautiful tableware” and horse gear from Secondhand Treasures.

“It’s not like a normal thrift store,” Dix said. “It’s really high quality. Everyone is nice and they seem to know you. The store is really well organized and stocked. I donate to it every time I move or clean the house – tables, chairs, books, household items. It’s a great resource for people and a wonderful thing for dogs.

“Here is the plan”

Secondhand Treasures has been in business, still in its current location, for over 11 years. The store was closed for nearly 14 months at the height of the pandemic, but despite that, it funneled half a million dollars in payments for vet bills, food, boarding, transportation, rehabilitation, training and sterilization procedures, Baumgardner said.

“Until the last few years (SWARF) has done a lot of direct rescue, like removing dogs from high-mortality shelters around New Mexico, nurturing them until they’re physically and mentally ready for adoption. and find homes for them,” she said. . “But it’s such emotionally and physically draining, heartbreaking work.”

Now, the organization is focused on funding other New Mexico animal rescue and assistance organizations, such as NMDOGS, OSCAR Foundation, Argos, and Spay-Neuter Coalition of New Mexico.

Baumgardner said SWARF has donated funds to international groups engaged in rescuing war animals in Ukraine and provided assistance to those helping animals affected by wildfires in New Mexico. SWARF also maintains a sanctuary for elderly, sick, injured and other animals that are not adoptable.

Even if Secondhand Treasures closes, Baumgardner said the rescue fund will continue its work.

“We have some money in the bank,” she said. ” Here is the plan. We will have one week sales at reduced prices, but not promotional prices. We will donate a lot (goods) to the OSCAR Foundation. Then we’ll store the rest at my house and have garage sales, maybe online sales.

But it won’t be the same.

short moment

Beth Quinn, a retired K-8 teacher from Albuquerque Public Schools, is in charge of the used book section at Secondhand Treasures.

“You walk in here and you’re in this cabin full of goods,” she said. “I try not to bring something home every day. Books are my baby. Mostly (I buy) books; a few works of art, small watercolors; and small wooden boxes because everyone needs wooden crates.

“Volunteers are full of energy and outgoing. Everyone gets along. It’s the kind of place you can’t wait to go.

Volunteer Jordan first became involved with SWARF when she asked for his help in rescuing a dog from a small town animal shelter. Now she owns the dog whose rescue she initiated and once a week she drives the 80 mile, hour and a quarter drive from San Acacia in Socorro County to work at the store.

“It’s a great group of women, all wanting to help animals, all of us here for the animals,” she said of the store’s volunteers.

The half-dozen volunteers are between 60 and 70 years old.

But Gabby Ruth, the only paid employee of Secondhand Treasure, is 30 years old. Due to the uncertain future of the store, she is looking for another job, but she does not want to leave the thrift store.

“Working there was honestly the best job I’ve ever had,” Ruth said. “Everyone knows each other and helps each other. It’s good to see where the profits go. It’s a warm atmosphere. »

Ruth said the stores’ customers range in age from young teenagers to older adults.

“The first thing people say when they walk in here is ‘Wow,'” Baumgardner said as she guided a visitor through the store. “We are truly recognized for the quality of our products and our selection. We have women’s shirts and pants, $6. Women’s jackets and dresses, $10. A section of women’s clothing at $15 and $16 – brands like Eileen Fisher. Men’s shirts, nice shirts, $6. Ralph Lauren, $6.

“We have a Christmas corner – decorations, mugs, nutcrackers – sold all year round. We have rocks – mica, petrified wood with copper, banite, fluorite. Someone came here one day and bought $600 worth of stones.

She paused as she looked around the store she had known for years but changed every day. She still holds out hope that another property will become available in Corrales, but she realizes that time is running out on this site.

“It’s sad because it’s not a bankrupt company,” she said. “It’s a really successful business and people love it. But we have to go.

UpFront is the Journal’s front-page news and opinion column. Comment directly to Ollie Reed at 505-823-3916 or oreed@abqjournal.com.

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MNR awards waterway improvement grants https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/mnr-awards-waterway-improvement-grants/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 16:38:33 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/mnr-awards-waterway-improvement-grants/ June 19, 2022 by WCBC Radio Funded projects statewide for new and improved boating access, navigation and safety Solley Cove Boat Ramp in Anne Arundel County, completed in 2021 with support from the Waterways Improvement Fund. Photo by Carla Fleming, Maryland Department of Natural Resources The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is providing $13.5 million […]]]>

June 19, 2022 by WCBC Radio

Funded projects statewide for new and improved boating access, navigation and safety

Solley Cove Boat Ramp in Anne Arundel County, completed in 2021 with support from the Waterways Improvement Fund. Photo by Carla Fleming, Maryland Department of Natural Resources

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is providing $13.5 million in Waterways Improvement Fund grants to improve and improve public access to boating, facilities and navigation throughout the state.

This funding is being awarded to 45 applicants across the state, supporting efforts that include new public boating access, amenities and facilities; dredging of waterways; emergency vessels and equipment for local first responders; and other important infrastructure and initiatives.

“The Maryland Waterways Improvement Fund has been an extremely valuable program for 56 years,” said Maryland Natural Resources Secretary Jeannie Haddaway-Riccio. “Without this, we would not be able to invest in these essential navigation projects in partnership with our counties, riverside communities and waterway users.”

The Waterways Improvement Fund was established in 1966 to support the development, enjoyment, and use of Maryland’s waters for the benefit of the general public. The fund comes primarily from the one-time 5% excise tax paid to the state when a boat is purchased and titled in the state, as well as a small portion of the state gasoline tax .

The Waterways Improvement Fund is primarily used for the construction and maintenance of more than 400 public navigation facilities and more than 250 public navigation canals across the state, as well as the acquisition of ships from icebreaking and salvage.

Applications are reviewed and projects selected based on local and state government needs and priorities, then evaluated to determine benefit to the general boating public.

MNR will be accepting applications for the Waterways Improvement Fund for the next fiscal year through the Online Grants Portal.

Projects funded in fiscal year 2023:

Anne Arundel County
Podickory Creek, Annapolis
Dredging
$325,000

Mill Creek, Arnold
Dredging
$362,500

South County Dredged Beneficial Use Site, Deale
$250,000

Baltimore County
Arbutus Volunteer Fire Department
Main lifeboat and engine replacement
$12,500

Bowleys Quarters Community Volunteer Fire Department, Middle River
Fire Boat Replacement Project
$50,000

Gunpowder Falls State Park, Dundee Creek Marina
Rehabilitation of dredged material placement
$200.00

Baltimore City
Baltimore City Fire Department
Fire rescue boat replacement, diving rescue team
$23,000

Carolina County
Choptank Marina, Preston
Installing the fuel tank
$250,000
Rehabilitation of the marina car park
$75,000

Martinak State Park
Rehabilitation engineering for the placement of dredged materials
$200,000

Cecil County
City of Charlestown
Engineering of dredging projects
0,000

Dorchester County
Crocheron Quay, Bishops Head
Partition and parking
$150,000

City of Cambridge, Franklin Street Boat Ramp
Pier repairs
$250,000

City of Cambridge Municipal Marina
Maintenance of floating breakwaters
$95,000

Harford County
Mariner Point Park, Joppa
Parking lot resurfacing
$200,000

Kent County
Betterton Fire Company
Purchase of a fire/rescue boat
$50,000

Prince George’s County
Prince George’s County Fire Department/EMS, Largo
Water Safety Rescue and Resource Enhancement
$15,000

Queen Anne’s County
Centerville Landing
Boat ramp replacement
$250,000

Deep landing ramp
Renovation of nautical facilities
$250,000

Kent Narrows – Chester River, North Approach Channel
Dredging
$1 million

Love Point State Park
Facilities Improvement Project
$800,000

Matapeake landing stage
Boat ramp replacement
$250,000

Matapeake Marine Terminal
Access channel dredging
$100,000

City of Queenstown
Queenstown Creek Channel Dredging – Phase I
$100,000

of Queen Anne County
Hydraulic boat trailer
$150,000

County of Somerset
Somers Cove Marina, Crisfield
Marina Bulkhead Replacement and Site Improvements – Phase 3
$3 million

Webster Cove Marina, Mount Vernon
Marina improvements
$150,000

St. Mary’s County
Point Lookout State Park
Boat ramps and jetty replacement
$500,000

Ridge Volunteer Fire Department
Emergency Response Raft Equipment
$50,000

St. George’s Creek
Maintenance Dredging and Beneficial Use at Piney Point
$540,000

Talbot County
Oak Creek Landing, Newcomb
Redo the terrace
$30,000

Windy Hill Landing, Trappe
Redo the terrace
$10,000

Wye Landing, Wye Mills
Repaving
$65,000

Washington County
Potomac Valley Fire Company, Sharpsburg
Lifeboat
$17,550

City of Williamsport
Engineering of the new boat launch
$70,000

Wicomico County
Cedar Hill Landing, Bivalve
Expansion of existing Wicomico County dredge placement site
$750,000

Nanticoke Harbor
Dredging
$50,000

Worcester County
Landing of the southern tip, Berlin
Restoration of the launching ramp. Assateague side
$250,000

Pocomoke River State ParkMilburn and Shad Landings
Replacement of the launching ramp and improvement of the toilet block
$1.2 million

Snow Hill public landing stage
Retaining wall/riprap engineering
$50,000

Statewide
Statewide Emergency Maintenance Dredging
$679,213

State correspondence for Federal Access to Navigation (BA) and Navigational Infrastructure Grant (BIG) grants
$250,000

Maryland Pumping Grant Program
$145,237

Natural Resources Police Purchase(s) of search and rescue vessels
$125,000

General maintenance and repairs of state-owned nautical facilities
$60,000

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Barry Dock volunteers rescue someone cut off by the tide https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/barry-dock-volunteers-rescue-someone-cut-off-by-the-tide/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 15:24:43 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/barry-dock-volunteers-rescue-someone-cut-off-by-the-tide/ Barry Dock RNLI volunteers had just finished a crew meeting and were about to light up the barbecue last night (Thursday June 17) when twenty pagers came to life. Shortly before 8pm, HM Coastguard requested the launch of an all-weather and inshore lifeboat Barry Dock to assist a man cut off by the tide at […]]]>

Barry Dock RNLI volunteers had just finished a crew meeting and were about to light up the barbecue last night (Thursday June 17) when twenty pagers came to life.

Shortly before 8pm, HM Coastguard requested the launch of an all-weather and inshore lifeboat Barry Dock to assist a man cut off by the tide at Rhoose Point. As the entire volunteer crew was already at the boathouse, the two lifeboats were able to launch immediately to help.

With the help of the Coastguard Rescue 187 helicopter, a man was located on the rocks at Rhoose Point, where he had been forced to climb to higher ground as the spring tide approached him. Once located, Barry Dock volunteers approached the rocks and were able to get close enough to help the person to safety in the inshore rescue boat. The man was then transferred to the all-weather lifeboat where he was assessed by the volunteer crew.

Back on dry land, the man was handed over to the care of the Barry Coastguard Team. Once checked in, he was then invited to join the lifeboat crew in eating while the volunteers chased down the station barbecue.

Chris Cousens, regional water safety officer at the RNLI, said:

“With warm weather expected throughout the weekend, it is expected to be a busy weekend on the coast.

“The tide rises and falls twice in a 24-hour period, and although tide times can be accurately predicted, they vary in each location and change daily. A beach or coastal area may seem like a safe place for a walk, but the rising tide can quickly leave you stranded. Even though the highest spring tides have now passed, there will still be high tides this weekend, so places will be cut off by the tide faster than normal and places usually not affected by the tide may also be cut off. .

“That’s why it’s essential to check the weather and tides using a trusted online source, such as magicseaweed.com, BBC weather or a tide forecasting app before you set out on your trip. .

“It is also essential to have a fully charged mobile phone or other means of calling for help when on a coastal walk so that you can dial 999 for the coastguard if you have any difficulty. It’s also important to tell someone else where you’re going and when you’re expected to return.

The RNLI urges anyone choosing to visit the coast to ensure their safety and that of their families by following beach safety advice:

  • Wherever you are, check weather forecasts, tide times and read local road signs to understand local risks.

  • If you fall into the water unexpectedly, FLOAT TO LIVE. Fight your instincts to thrash around, lean back, extend your arms and legs, and float.

  • In an emergency, dial 999 and ask for the Coast Guard.

Notes to Editor

Attached is a photo of the Barry Dock inshore lifeboat responding to the call for duty last night. Credit: RNLI/Barry Dock.

RNLI press contact

For further information contact Eleri Roberts, RNLI Regional Media Officer on 07771 941390 or email [email protected] You can also contact the RNLI press office on 01202 336789 / [email protected]

RNLI Highlights

The charity RNLI saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service on the coasts of the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. The RNLI operates 238 lifeguard stations in the UK and Ireland and over 240 lifeguard units on beaches in the UK and the Channel Islands. The RNLI is independent of the coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its lifesaving service. Since the RNLI’s inception in 1824, its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved more than 142,700 lives.

Find out more about the RNLI

For more information, please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and Youtube. Press releases, videos and photos are available on the News Center.

Contact the RNLI – public inquiries

Members of the public can contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 (UK) or 1800 991802 (Ireland) or by email.

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Briefs from Tri-Town News, June 15 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/briefs-from-tri-town-news-june-15/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 17:00:04 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/briefs-from-tri-town-news-june-15/ Jackson residents who want to run in the 2022 election have until 4 p.m. Sept. 6 to file a nomination petition, according to a legal notice issued by Township Clerk Diane Festino. Jackson’s non-partisan municipal election will be held Nov. 8. The mayoral term currently held by Michael Reina and the council terms currently held […]]]>

Jackson residents who want to run in the 2022 election have until 4 p.m. Sept. 6 to file a nomination petition, according to a legal notice issued by Township Clerk Diane Festino.

Jackson’s non-partisan municipal election will be held Nov. 8. The mayoral term currently held by Michael Reina and the council terms currently held by Andrew Kern and Alex Sauickie will be on the ballot. All terms are four years, from January 1, 2023 to December 31, 2026.

The other current members of the city council — Nino Borrelli, Steve Chisholm Jr. and Martin Flemming — are serving terms that will end Dec. 31, 2024.

All municipal officials in Jackson are elected by popular vote in a plurality vote. Candidates do not run under the banner of a political party.

Nomination petitions will be available beginning June 15 at the City Clerk’s Office, 95 West Veterans Highway, for those wishing to participate in the 2022 election. Petitions can be picked up Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. The deadline for filing a petition is September 6 at 4 p.m., according to the legal notice.

During its meeting on On June 15, the Jackson Zoning Board of Adjustment is scheduled to consider an application by Swanborne, LLC, seeking preliminary and final approval of major subdivision and preliminary and final approval of major site plan, as well as approval of conditional use and conditional use variance relief regarding the property bounded by East Veterans Highway (Route 528) to the north, South Hope Chapel Road (Route 547) to the east and Whitesville Road (Route 527) south and west, according to a legal opinion issued by attorney John Giunco, who is representing the plaintiff.

The application proposes to subdivide the property to allow for the construction of an inclusive residential development of 253 units, including 205 detached single-family residential lots (two of which are existing residences to remain); a lot for the construction of six multi-family residential buildings containing a total of 48 affordable units for very low, low and middle income families and individuals; a lot for the construction of a two-storey place of worship; construction of a proposed recreation area; a lot for a sanitary sewer pumping station; and four stormwater management/open space lots.

The property is 158 acres in size and is within Jackson’s Regional Growth Zone 2 and the proposed uses are conditionally permitted in Zone RG-2.

Applicant will seek conditional use variance relief to permit affordable housing in attached units with eight units per building, where a local ordinance permits attached units with a maximum of four units per building; and to permit parking and walkways within the front yard setback and buffer zone of the proposed place of worship.

The zoning board meeting will be held at 7:00 p.m. on June 15 at the municipal building.

Green Leaf Pet Resort, Millstone Township partners with big names in the pet care industry to raise funds for the CentraState Healthcare Foundation.

On June 25, from noon to 6 p.m., Green Leaf Pet Resort will welcome thousands of animal-loving attendees to its Canine Carnival – Paws for a Cause event. Organizers said 100% of proceeds won will be donated to the CentraState Healthcare Foundation to support its mission to the community, according to a press release.

Admission is free and all furry, furry and feathered friends are encouraged to attend. There will be carnival games, dog dock dives, lure lessons, a New Jersey State Police K-9 demonstration, food trucks, vendor tables, face painting and live musical performances.

A highlight of the day will be the raffles, one of which is for a 2022 Crosstrek lease donated by All American Subaru of Old Bridge. Dog lovers will be supported by VCA’s mobile triage unit and “Ask-A-Vet” station, as well as Fi’s Microchip station, according to the press release.

“We are happy to be able to give back,” said Shelly Leibowitz, co-founder and owner of Green Leaf Pet Resort. “We believe in what CentraState does for our community, spouses, loved ones, and children. We are both foundations built on love.

For more information visit www.greenleafcaninecarnival.com

New Jersey US Water announced the recipients of its 2022 Volunteer Fire and EMS grant program.

This year, 23 volunteer fire and EMS departments in company service areas have been chosen to receive grants, totaling more than $41,000, which will be used to support initiatives, training and/or improved equipment to help responders better protect themselves and communities. they serve, according to a press release.

Howell Township First Aid and Rescue Squad No. 1 received a grant from the company.

The grants will be used in a variety of ways by each department, including the purchase of automatic external defibrillators, fire hoses, ice rescue suits and other lifesaving equipment, as well as training courses and tools. , according to the press release.

Electric Atlantic City, Exelon, the Drumthwacket Foundation and Sustainable Jersey honored six student teams for their NJ Student Climate Challenge action projects, which offer innovative approaches to help solve the current problem of climate change.

Teams of high school and college students were tasked with developing and executing a school or community climate action project and creating a digital story or video to capture their project’s approach and impacts climate, according to a press release.

In the college category, first place went to the Compost United team from Howell Middle School South and third place went to the Fantastic Plastics team from Howell Middle School South.

The student team winners and their teacher mentors were recognized June 8 at an awards ceremony hosted by the Drumthwacket Foundation featuring New Jersey First Lady Tammy Murphy.

Winners were selected by a panel of judges comprised of educators and representatives from local nonprofits, state agencies, and partner organizations. The winning schools received a grant to support their climate education initiatives, according to the press release.

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‘Nacho’ the rescue dog gets a new home in the Florida Keys https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/nacho-the-rescue-dog-gets-a-new-home-in-the-florida-keys/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 16:36:47 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/nacho-the-rescue-dog-gets-a-new-home-in-the-florida-keys/ Nacho is an 18 month old golden retriever from Idaho. But it didn’t take long to discover paradise. Hot off his cross-country road trip on Sunday, Nacho found out what life is like in the Florida Keys. He walked to the back dock of his new family’s home in Sugarloaf Key, inspected the scene – […]]]>

Nacho is an 18 month old golden retriever from Idaho. But it didn’t take long to discover paradise.

Hot off his cross-country road trip on Sunday, Nacho found out what life is like in the Florida Keys. He walked to the back dock of his new family’s home in Sugarloaf Key, inspected the scene – and confidently dove into the salt water.

nachoportrait.jpg
Nacho, an 18-month-old golden retriever with special needs, arrived in the Keys on June 13, 2022, after a 5-day road trip that began in his native Idaho. Photo provided by the Golden Ratio Foundation

It started to take a ride but returned to its owners, Jen Golbeck and Ingo Burghardt. They lured him to dry land by offering him a ball.

“Alone without coaxing,” said Golbeck, 45. “It shows he’s just a confident dog. He wasn’t afraid that we were letting anything happen. He had been here two hours at the time.

Nacho is curious, well-mannered, playful, goofy – and into his toys, his owners report.

“Definitely obsessed with the ball,” Golbeck said. “He tried to stick his nose out the closet door.”

When Nacho arrived in the Keys, it took about five minutes to get him out of the car. But once he got out, he trotted around the yard like he owned it.

Nacho is the newest and youngest member of the couple’s pack, called the Gold number. Nacho joins Venkman, 7, Hopper, 8, Guacamole, 5, Remoulade, 6, and Chief Brody, 12.

Golbeck can single out the Goldens, but Burghardt admitted he has to check sometimes.

The dogs are happy now, but some of them have sad stories.

Remoulade came with a scar around his neck after being chained up for six years. He also lacks fur and has never visited a vet. On Sunday, he was walking around his house with the pack, showing off a nice coat.

Years ago, another dog hid in a guest bedroom for a month after arriving. Hopper has a leg after having cancer. (She was named before she lost the member.)

“You see them transform after a few months from these sometimes really terrified, anxious, sick dogs into happy Keys dogs playing in the water,” Golbeck said.

Golbeck understands that many people cannot afford to care for their pets and is grateful that they can step in for so many dogs. They had a dog that required about $30,000 a year in surgery. It was Voodoo, 5, who suffered from epilepsy and died a few weeks ago. He had cluster seizures and had to travel to Miami for treatment and would remain in intensive care.

“We are very lucky right now to be able to afford to care for these dogs,” she said. “For the vast majority of my life, I was barely getting by on every check. I understand being broke.

These dogs have much more than a bowl of kibble: they have their own calendar, a range of products and a wiki page. They even have a podcast. Host of Golbeck and Burghardt the Golden ratioa witty critique of the stories and dogs of the Keys.

Golbeck, a computer scientist who teaches at the University of Maryland, is working on a book, “The Purest Bond,” about the science of people bonding with their dogs.

The couple started the Foundation of the golden ratio, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of golden retrievers and their friends. They have over 800,000 social media followers, including about 153,000 on Twitter.

Twitter helped rescue Nacho and find him a forever home in the Keys where he could join other special needs dogs and some senior citizens.

sixdogs.jpg
Remoulade, Venkman, Nacho, Guacamole, Hopper and Chief Brody, a pack of special needs golden retrievers, were all adopted by a Florida Keys family. Nacho is the newest member of the pack. Photo provided by the Golden Ratio Foundation

People on the social platform started a ‘Save Nacho’ movement which had supporters cheering on the dog and his volunteer friends as they hit the highways. Nacho was in fashion on Sunday evening, after news of his arrival and video of his impromptu swim were displayed.

In Idaho, Nacho had been abandoned by his owners, who couldn’t pay vet bills related to the dog’s severe allergies, treated in part with prescribed food and injections. He may also have a knee injury that could require surgery.

Nacho was first taken in by the Herd House, an animal shelter, shelter and hospice in southeast Idaho. The non-profit organization began looking for its permanent home. Once Twitter learned the young golden boy needed a new family, all tweets led to Goldbeck and Burghardt, who were ready to add him to the pack.

cover.jpg
Nacho on his way to the Florida Keys.

On Twitter, the couple recruited volunteers, who drove Nacho in teams about 2,739 miles from Pocatello, Idaho, to Sugarloaf Key. Other people gave Nacho places to stay throughout his journey.

An online network of dog fans stepped in to help.

People who lived in Denver drove to Salt Lake City to pick up Nacho, stayed overnight, and then drove back to Denver, Golbeck said.

So far, none of Nacho’s drivers or hosts have requested or accepted compensation. Everyone received an email from the couple offering to pay the expenses.

“We offered to pay for gas,” Golbeck said. “No one emailed me. »

Since 2016, between their dogs and their foster families, the couple have had around 30 dogs at home. There was grief too.

“There were times when we lost two within a week or two of each other,” Golbeck said. “It just breaks a part of you.”

“Even if we see these dogs at the end of their lives, it’s gratifying,” she said. “We make it peaceful, joyful and as sweet as possible. It’s kind of an honor to do that.

She just can’t turn away when she sees a dog in need of a loving home.

“I can’t say no; it’s really tough,” Golbeck said, taking stock of the cost, emotional toll and energy it takes to care for a pack of goldens. “It’s a very happy place.”

Miami Herald Related Stories

Gwen Filosa covers Key West and the Lower Florida Keys for FLKeysNews.com and the Miami Herald and lives in Key West. She was on the staff of the New Orleans Times-Picayune which in 2005 won two Pulitzer Prizes for its coverage of Hurricane Katrina. She graduated from Indiana University.

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Hurricane Expo educates the public – as first named storm approaches Florida https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/hurricane-expo-educates-the-public-as-first-named-storm-approaches-florida/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 20:38:46 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/hurricane-expo-educates-the-public-as-first-named-storm-approaches-florida/ Saturday, June 4 dawned with clouds and the threat of rain, along with the first named storm of the season approaching Florida, so the timing for Hurricane Expo couldn’t have been better. . The Hernando County Emergency Management Department organized the event with the help of an educational grant from Duke Energy. About forty vendors […]]]>

Saturday, June 4 dawned with clouds and the threat of rain, along with the first named storm of the season approaching Florida, so the timing for Hurricane Expo couldn’t have been better. . The Hernando County Emergency Management Department organized the event with the help of an educational grant from Duke Energy.

About forty vendors and exhibitors were on hand to give demonstrations and hand out literature to attendees. Most were county agencies or volunteer organizations, such as the Sheriff’s Office, Fire and Rescue, Civil Air Patrol, and Crime Watch. Among the companies represented were those that sold storm protection equipment, gutter protection and disaster remediation services. Three meteorologists representing local television stations moderated a round table discussion on the theme of hurricanes. Radio station WWJB and 103.9 FM the Boot broadcast live from Hernando Park in downtown Brooksville.

It is the first hurricane exhibit to be held since the Covid pandemic hit in 2020. Emergency management planner Brittany Brooks said that while she and her fellow organizers have had fewer three months to plan the exhibition, they were satisfied with the result. A total of around 438 people (including vendors and exhibitors) showed up at the event.

“Everyone seemed to enjoy the exhibit. Many left with all types of literature to share with their friends,” said Angel Thomas, emergency management specialist.

Brian Burback, fire department captain and crime watch coordinator for Ridge Manor, was there to explain what his organization does. Crime Watch Units are staffed entirely by volunteers and coordinate their efforts with the Community Oriented Policing (COPS) Unit and Crime Prevention Assistants. They are always looking for volunteers. The only stipulation is that you must be twenty-one or older to drive the Crime Watch vehicle. There are approximately 25 neighborhood crime watch units in the county. For more information you can call 352-797-3660 or go to: https://www.hernandosheriff.org/CrimeWatch.aspx

Representatives of the local Civil Air Patrol (CAP) were also present to educate the public on their role in emergencies and disasters. Hernando County’s all-volunteer organization is made up of senior (adult) and cadet members ages 12-18. CAP has many facets, however, when it comes to hurricanes and other disasters, Civil Air Patrol has important functions.

“In a hurricane situation, our responses are coordinated by the state organization. We are going to areas with search and rescue operations, delivering food, water and other supplies to victims and helping with hurricane shelters,” said Richard Johnson, head of the public information at the CAP.

You can find out more about Civil Air Patrol at: https://fl301.cap.gov/ or follow them on their Facebook page: “Hernando County Composite Squadron, Civil Air Patrol”.

Flood prevention and stormwater remediation are extremely important for both hurricane preparedness and the aftermath of a major storm. John Burnett is a water resources specialist with the Hernando County Department of Public Works.

“If we have enough warnings, we will go out and do preventive maintenance in areas where we know we have problems. We will remove debris from drainage systems. After the storm, we will visit the hardest hit areas and determine if any infrastructure has been damaged, such as pipes, bridges or roads that may have been swept away,” Burnett noted. This work is critical to estimating the value of the damage so the county can apply for disaster relief funds.

An essential skill, not just in a hurricane or other natural disaster, but in any emergency, is knowing how to perform CPR. It’s a simple technique that even a child can learn. According to Vince Montefusco, training officer for the all-volunteer Hernando County Fire Department, 90 percent of people who need CPR don’t get it and die. In many cases, there was someone else present who could have performed the rescue technique and kept the person alive until paramedics arrived. Expo attendees

took a short CPR lesson and performed it on a dummy. The Hernando County Fire Department runs free classes in CPR and other first aid, but you can go to: https://www.verywellhealth.com/how-do-chest-compressions-work-1298428 for an explanation of the technique.

The Fire and Rescue Department and the Sheriff’s Office were there to show off some of their gear. These included drones used by the two to help solve crimes, assist in search and rescue, locate victims in burning buildings and other operations. A future article will deal with this subject in depth.

This year’s long-awaited Hurricane Expo has provided life-saving tips and information that will come in handy in the event of a hurricane or other natural disaster.

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Dove Creek Equine Rescue asks for help due to severe drought conditions https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/dove-creek-equine-rescue-asks-for-help-due-to-severe-drought-conditions/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 21:15:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/dove-creek-equine-rescue-asks-for-help-due-to-severe-drought-conditions/ AMARILLO, Texas (KFDA) – Dove Creek Equine Rescue is asking for help due to severe drought conditions. A press release says the “When in Drought” campaign is raising emergency funds to help cover hay and feed costs. The 2022 US Drought Monitor shows parts of the Texas Panhandle and West Texas are experiencing exceptional drought […]]]>

AMARILLO, Texas (KFDA) – Dove Creek Equine Rescue is asking for help due to severe drought conditions.

A press release says the “When in Drought” campaign is raising emergency funds to help cover hay and feed costs.

The 2022 US Drought Monitor shows parts of the Texas Panhandle and West Texas are experiencing exceptional drought conditions due to water in reservoirs, streams and wells, and widespread crop and pasture losses .

The rescue has 30 horses during this time because less rainfall means less grass to graze on pasture.

“With less pasture to graze, we are experiencing higher feed and hay costs this year. Limited hay sources and higher prices have forced us to find other ways to feed,” said Laurie Higgins-Kerley, general manager of Dove Creek.

With the campaign, the rescue hopes to raise $20,000 in 10 weeks to offset the rising cost of hay. The campaign runs from June 8 to August 17.

Higgins-Kerley said this is a crisis facing the rescue.

“Over the decade-long history of the rescue, horses have been able to graze on the ranch’s rich pastures from April through October, which is why we were able to operate with reduced hay costs during those months,” said Higgins-Kerley. . “Our herd of rescued horses have 500 acres to graze, but without rain it goes away. This is the first year I remember them not being able to graze and get food due to lack of rain. . »

Director of Rescue Operations and Volunteer Coordinator Ali McEwen explained the impact on the rescue.

“In order to maintain a healthy diet for the herd, we had to buy hay all of May and were forced to buy enough to get us through June as well,” McEwen said. “This is an additional cost of $9,700 to our food budget, an increase of 73%. We invite interested donors to consider a donation of $26 or more to help us feed the herd throughout the summer. A donation of $26 will buy two square bales, enough to feed 4 horses for a day. A donation of $135 will buy a 1,000 pound round bale, which feeds our entire herd of thirty people for two days.

Donations can be made here.

Copyright 2022 KFDA. All rights reserved.

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The Day – Volunteer firefighters get payouts for highway calls https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/the-day-volunteer-firefighters-get-payouts-for-highway-calls/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 23:25:26 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/the-day-volunteer-firefighters-get-payouts-for-highway-calls/ Mystic – Through the efforts of the Old Mystic Fire Department and State Rep. Greg Howard, R-Stonington, volunteer fire departments across the state responding to calls on limited-access highways such that highways 95 and 395 will receive $500 per appeal from the state. Payments were instituted in 1959 at $25 per call. They rose to […]]]>

Mystic – Through the efforts of the Old Mystic Fire Department and State Rep. Greg Howard, R-Stonington, volunteer fire departments across the state responding to calls on limited-access highways such that highways 95 and 395 will receive $500 per appeal from the state.

Payments were instituted in 1959 at $25 per call. They rose to 0 in 1971 and remained at that amount until 2003, when the law establishing them was repealed. Since then, departments such as Old Mystic, which responds to approximately 40 accident, fire and medical emergency calls per year on I-95 from exits 88 through 91, have not received any payment.

Old Mystic Fire Chief Ken Richards Jr. and Old Mystic Fire District Vice President Mike Pacheco brought the matter to the attention of Howard, a member of the City’s Public Safety Committee. the General Assembly, pointing out that these were the ratepayers of the Old Mystic Fire District, not the state. taxpayers, who pay the cost of calls, which sometimes involve having vehicles and personnel idling on the highway for many hours. While state police respond to calls on limited-access highways, there is no state fire department to respond, leaving the response to local fire departments.

“Since 2002, the Old Mystic Fire Department has provided services to Connecticut state ratepayers, with the cost paid by Old Mystic ratepayers,” Richards said Tuesday.

“We just want our taxpayers to get a break,” Pacheco added.

Both men said the department was committed to providing fire services on the highway. As an example, Pacheco pointed out that the department’s $950,000 rescue truck was specially equipped to handle the incidents it responds to on the highway. District ratepayers paid for this truck and all the others that responded.

With the exception of Groton and New London, which have paid fire departments and are not eligible for payments, many other towns in southeastern Connecticut have volunteer departments that respond to calls on I-95s. and I-395.

Howard explained that after the bill came out of the Legislature’s Public Safety and Justice Committees, the plan and its funding were incorporated into the state budget adjustment bill that was adopted by the General Assembly. Although he worked to get the money for freeway calls approved, Howard ended up voting against the budget bill because he opposed other areas of spending.

The budget includes $1.5 million in payments to reimburse volunteer services for 3,000 calls during the state fiscal year.

While a reimbursement of around $20,000 a year won’t cover the cost of equipment wear and increased fuel costs involved in answering road calls, Richards and Pacheco both praised the annual district budget revenue of $2.2 million. They said $20,000 is the cost of a single extrication tool on the rescue truck.

An analysis of 2021 road calls pegged the department’s costs at $33,431, based on equipment rates from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

“We’re grateful to Greg (Howard) for being proactive about this,” Pacheco said.

j.wojtas@theday.com

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Baltimore RNLI on a 9am intervention to help a yacht in difficulty https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/baltimore-rnli-on-a-9am-intervention-to-help-a-yacht-in-difficulty/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 09:11:39 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/baltimore-rnli-on-a-9am-intervention-to-help-a-yacht-in-difficulty/ Baltimore RNLI was called in to provide assistance to a yacht with four people on board which ran into difficulty 52 miles off Baltimore, West Cork, yesterday (Sunday June 5). The volunteer lifeboat crew launched their all-weather lifeboat just before 1 p.m. following requests from the Irish Coast Guard and the UK Coast Guard to […]]]>

Baltimore RNLI was called in to provide assistance to a yacht with four people on board which ran into difficulty 52 miles off Baltimore, West Cork, yesterday (Sunday June 5).

The volunteer lifeboat crew launched their all-weather lifeboat just before 1 p.m. following requests from the Irish Coast Guard and the UK Coast Guard to come to the rescue of a 36ft motor yacht, with four people on board, who had encountered difficulties and was 52 years old. miles south of Baltimore.

The Baltimore all-weather lifeboat crew arrived at the casualty vessel at 3:22 p.m. After ensuring that all four people on board were okay, helmsman Aidan Bushe assessed the situation and decided that
undertaking a tow was necessary and the surest way to help the victims.

Volunteer lifeboat crew members towed the yacht and the lifeboat and salvage vessel were underway by 3:30 p.m. The lifeboat then proceeded to Baltimore Harbor, the nearest safe and suitable port, and secured the casualty vessel to the pontoon at 10:14 p.m. The lifeboat then returned to the station, arriving at 10:25 p.m.

There were six volunteer crew aboard the lifeboat, helmsman Aidan Bushe, engineer Micheal Cottrell and crew members Pat Collins, David Ryan, Colin Whooley and Jim Griffiths. The sea conditions during the stopover were rough with a force 3-4 easterly wind, a 1.1 m swell and good visibility.

Speaking following the call, Baltimore RNLI Volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer Kate Callanan said: ‘It was a long call for our volunteer lifeboat crew who spent over 9 hours at sea, but the occupants of the yacht did the right thing by asking for help. We wish them good luck for the rest of their journey. If you encounter difficulties at sea or on the coast, call 999 or 112 and ask for the coast guard.

RNLI Highlights

The charity RNLI saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service on the coasts of the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. The RNLI operates 238 lifeguard stations in the UK and Ireland and over 240 lifeguard units on beaches in the UK and the Channel Islands. The RNLI is independent of the coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its lifesaving service. Since the RNLI’s inception in 1824, its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved more than 142,700 lives.

Find out more about the RNLI

For more information, please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and Youtube. Press releases, videos and photos are available on the News Center.

Contact the RNLI – public inquiries

Members of the public can contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 (UK) or 1800 991802 (Ireland) or by email.

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Riverside High School: David Stehlar took a fiery path during his high school career, starting to work with the Kalispel Tribe firefighters but ending up online https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/riverside-high-school-david-stehlar-took-a-fiery-path-during-his-high-school-career-starting-to-work-with-the-kalispel-tribe-firefighters-but-ending-up-online/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 16:11:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/riverside-high-school-david-stehlar-took-a-fiery-path-during-his-high-school-career-starting-to-work-with-the-kalispel-tribe-firefighters-but-ending-up-online/ For David Stehlar, it wasn’t athletics, studying or partying that made high school memorable — it was firefighting. Inspired by the movie “Only the Brave”, Stehlar became interested in firefighting as a career. Stehlar began volunteering with South Pend Oreille Fire & Rescue in April of his freshman year at Riverside High School. Voluntary firefighting […]]]>

For David Stehlar, it wasn’t athletics, studying or partying that made high school memorable — it was firefighting.

Inspired by the movie “Only the Brave”, Stehlar became interested in firefighting as a career.

Stehlar began volunteering with South Pend Oreille Fire & Rescue in April of his freshman year at Riverside High School.

Voluntary firefighting gave him the opportunity to explore the work, allowing him to discover that he had a passion for the field.

While Stehlar has trained throughout his firefighting career, his formal academy program began in October, the fall of his senior year. He graduated from the academy in December, four days after turning 18.

The schedule included classes on Wednesdays and training on Saturdays, primarily around structural fires. He has completed his required training and can operate the aircraft. He hopes to eventually try smokejumping.

“I’m looking forward to gaining experience with more wild land so I can improve,” Stehlar said.

This fire season he has been hired by the Kalispel Tribe and will be stationed in Usk. He left home on May 2 to start work on May 3. He will be graduating from HRH with his class but is completing his final year online.

Besides firefighting, Stehlar has been active with extracurriculars and academics.

Prior to the fire academy, Stehlar spent the majority of his time on a farm, living on one farm with his family and working on another. He started working on a farm when he was 14, looking for a way to earn money.

“I was raised on a farm, so instead of just doing chores around the house, I now got paid for it,” Stehlar said.

Farm work can be grueling and require 10 to 12 hour work weeks at times. He quit farm work in November to focus on firefighting.

Stehlar has raised pigs and sheep for 4-H and FFA, showing pigs at the Junior Livestock Show in Spokane every year since he was in third grade. He is in his 12th year of 4-H, having also shown cattle at the Clayton Community Fair since kindergarten.

This year, RHS has brought back its FFA program, where Stehlar serves on the officer team as a sentry and participates in the cattle judging team.

“He was always an active kid,” said his mother, Amanda Stehlar. “It’s always fun, he just did everything to keep busy.”

Throughout his senior year, Stehlar attended school full-time, was an active member of 4-H and the FFA, wrestled and played baseball for the Riverside Rams while attending night classes and training for the fire department. With all of his extracurriculars, Stehlar maintained better than a 3.1 for the entire high school.

“I didn’t really have to worry about him,” Amanda said. “He always did the right thing and made good choices.”

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