Rescue Volunteer – Owl And Monkey Haven http://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 01:51:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Rescue Volunteer – Owl And Monkey Haven http://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/ 32 32 Vander Meer appointed to Ammon City Council | Government https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/vander-meer-appointed-to-ammon-city-council-government/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 22:30:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/vander-meer-appointed-to-ammon-city-council-government/ Country united states of americaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic ofBarbadosBelarusBelgium, […]]]>

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The death of Charlise Mutten has devastating consequences for the RFS volunteer who searched the bush for days https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/the-death-of-charlise-mutten-has-devastating-consequences-for-the-rfs-volunteer-who-searched-the-bush-for-days/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 03:52:34 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/the-death-of-charlise-mutten-has-devastating-consequences-for-the-rfs-volunteer-who-searched-the-bush-for-days/ One of the volunteers who led the search for murdered schoolgirl Charlise Mutten described the impact of her death as “a very personal and deeply distressing experience”. Key points: Charlise Mutten’s body was found in a barrel on Tuesday evening RFS volunteer Darren Rodrigo says ‘things haven’t piled up’ since the search began A forensic […]]]>

One of the volunteers who led the search for murdered schoolgirl Charlise Mutten described the impact of her death as “a very personal and deeply distressing experience”.

Rural Fire Department volunteer Darren Rodrigo has spent days roaming the dense bush and tackling the rugged terrain of the Blue Mountains with one thing on his mind: to find a missing girl.

He said that even though the hundreds of search volunteers suspected that Charlise was not in fact missing, they could not give up the search.

“We knew things weren’t stacking up from the start when we started the search, but we had to operate on the basis that we were looking for a missing girl,” Mr Rodrigo said.

Charlise Mutten was a highly regarded student at Tweed Heads Public School.(Facebook: Tweed Heads Public School )

But their hopes turned to tragedy when police found the nine-year-old’s body in a barrel on the banks of the Colo River, northwest of Sydney, late on Tuesday evening.

“Killing and death when it happens to other people, it seems so detached – but it becomes so much more real when you’re out there looking for the person for hours in the bush,” he said.

“There was a lot of love for Charlise here – hundreds of people I think gave their hearts and souls to find her – it’s just devastating.

“It affected me in a way that I didn’t really expect, it was harder than I thought.”

Kallista Mutten
Kallista Mutten is still under medical supervision and has not been properly questioned by the police.(Provided)

Charlise was vacationing with her mother Kallista Mutten and her fiancé Justin Stein at her family’s luxury estate in Mount Wilson when she was reported missing last Friday.

But court documents allege the elementary school student was killed as early as Tuesday.

Hours after discovering his remains, homicide detectives arrested Mr Stein at a flat on Riley Street in Surry Hills, Sydney city center and charged him with murder.

Police said anomalies in their version of events, CCTV, phone intercepts and GPS tracking helped them break through.

They traced Mr Stein’s movements and found he had bought 100 kilograms of sandbags in 20 kilogram batches and attempted to launch a boat in Sydney before heading down the Colo River.

Justin Stein
Accused murderer Justin Stein is engaged to Charlise’s mother.(Provided: Facebook)

The hundreds of volunteers who searched for Charlise day and night in the dense bush have been offered advice, including Mr Rodrigo, as they begin to process the news

“We gave everything we had and she didn’t make it without a lot of love,” he said.

“Everyone was exhausted, but they just didn’t say anything. There was a real sense of determination there.

“I’m so sorry this happened to her, I hope she has found peace, of course our deepest condolences to Charlise’s family and friends.”

People looking for clues in the bush
Volunteers who gave up their free time to look for Charlise were offered advice.(Provided)

Charlise won a literacy award while attending Tweed Heads Public School on the Queensland border, where she lived with her grandmother Deborah Mutten.

Dozens of people continue to place bouquets of flowers, photos, messages and teddy bears in front of the school gates.

“It really put a dagger in the heart of the local community,” said Tweed MP Geoff Provest.

Kallista Mutten remains in the custody of doctors after being hospitalized shortly after reporting her daughter missing on Friday.

Homicide detectives were unable to formally interview him and were unable to establish a motive, or determine exactly how Charlise died.

Once Ms Mutton is deemed ‘medically fit’, she is expected to be questioned about the alleged murder.

A forensic search of the bush around the Colo River continues today, with police insisting the investigation is still in its early stages.

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Dog recovers from ‘worst case of neglect’ local animal rescue has seen https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/dog-recovers-from-worst-case-of-neglect-local-animal-rescue-has-seen/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 07:08:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/dog-recovers-from-worst-case-of-neglect-local-animal-rescue-has-seen/ WICHITA, Kan. (KWCH) — After more than two and a half months at Colorado State University Veterinary Hospital, a dog found chained up in a south Wichita yard in late October returned home on Sunday. Volunteers from the local Beauties and Beasts animal shelter said Chevelle, a four-year-old Pitbull, had suffered one of the worst […]]]>

WICHITA, Kan. (KWCH) — After more than two and a half months at Colorado State University Veterinary Hospital, a dog found chained up in a south Wichita yard in late October returned home on Sunday.

Volunteers from the local Beauties and Beasts animal shelter said Chevelle, a four-year-old Pitbull, had suffered one of the worst cases of animal abuse and neglect they had ever seen.

“He was in such bad shape he could barely lift his head,” said Randi Carter, vice president of Beauties and Beasts. “His weight was so low and his body so weak that he was so devoid of everything he needed to survive.”

Even the volunteers who rescued Chevlle had not anticipated the extent of the neglect he endured, as deep, infected wounds covered his body. More than half of his tongue was missing.

“The vets came back and said the injuries were caused by thermal or chemical burns that occurred in his mouth and all over his body,” Carter said. “Whether someone poured this on him or not is unknown. They couldn’t pin anything on the owner.

Initially, Chevelle’s chances of survival were low. But after two and a half months of intensive medical care and nearly $40,000 in medical bills, Chevelle miraculously recovered.

“Hours spent fundraising and going back and forth, all of that doesn’t matter,” Carter said. “He’s finally becoming a dog, he wasn’t a dog before…it’s worth every second.”

On Sunday, Chevelle reunited with the volunteer who rescued him from the backyard, who decided to adopt him.

“When I picked him up from the garden, there was no life in his eyes,” said Nichol Scrivner, a longtime volunteer with the charity. “I dropped him off at the ER and promised if he survived he would have a home.”

With Chevelle still a few months away from his injuries being fully healed, he can now start a new life in a loving home.

“I want him to be this chained dog advocate, to know there’s hope,” Scrivner said. “We just need everyone to say something if they see something.”

Chevelle is the most expensive case in the rescue to date, and the organization said he still has about $10,000 left to pay in medical bills. You can donate to help Beauties and Beasts Rescue with Chevelle’s medical bills here.

https://www.kwch.com/2021/11/18/graphic-wichita-dog-found-emaciated-dehydrated-missing-half-its-tongue/

Copyright 2022 KWCH. All rights reserved.

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Yucaipa recognizes the local search and rescue team | News https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/yucaipa-recognizes-the-local-search-and-rescue-team-news/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 20:25:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/yucaipa-recognizes-the-local-search-and-rescue-team-news/ On January 10, Lt. Robert Warrick introduced the San Gorgonio Search and Rescue Team to the Yucaipa City Council. Warrick said the search and rescue team was organized in 1958. “It is now made up of about 40 active members and they give about 8,000 hours a year,” he said. “It’s very impressive, because all […]]]>

On January 10, Lt. Robert Warrick introduced the San Gorgonio Search and Rescue Team to the Yucaipa City Council. Warrick said the search and rescue team was organized in 1958. “It is now made up of about 40 active members and they give about 8,000 hours a year,” he said. “It’s very impressive, because all the members are volunteers. Volunteers are made up of people with full-time careers who have retired from long full-time careers and are available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. “They have helped us with many search and rescues in our local mountains, as well as here in the city. They have helped search for missing children, adults with reduced mental capacity and the list goes on and on” , said Warrick Pro Tem Mayor Justin Beaver said: “I think it’s telling that these people are so dedicated to their profession that last month they did what they do best and responded to the immediate call to go save lives despite the recognition that they all knew was coming.” Beaver continued, “It’s awesome and Colonel Doolittle said, ‘There’s nothing stronger than a volunteer’s heart’ and we really appreciate our volunteers. Thank you so much for all you do.” Councilman Jon Thorp echoed Beaver’s sentiments Mayor David Avila said, “I think you are an extremely valuable part of the Sheriff’s Department and the community as a whole and thank you for your service. Council member Greg Bogh read the recognition to search and rescue volunteers and the public in attendance. Bogh said, “We have a certificate of recognition presented to the search and rescue team at San Gorgonio.” recognition and celebration of your invaluable service to the community, the county and the state of California, to the volunteers who selflessly give their time, commitment and valiant efforts, have made a difference in ur many people in need… Thank you very much . You guys are awesome,” Bogh said. A Certificate of Appreciation was also presented by Representative Assemblyman Chad Mayes to the volunteers of the San Gorgonio Search and Rescue Team. Warrick read the certificate and it read, “On behalf of the California State Assembly, I am pleased to congratulate the volunteers of the San Gorgonio Search and Rescue Team. You are commended for your leadership, protection and stewardship of the people of our community. Please accept my most sincere congratulations. Signed Chad Mayes, 42nd Assembly District..” The presentation can be heard at yucaipa.org.

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Golden girl Betty White leaves behind a legacy to help keep animals alive | Bendigo Advertiser https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/golden-girl-betty-white-leaves-behind-a-legacy-to-help-keep-animals-alive-bendigo-advertiser/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/golden-girl-betty-white-leaves-behind-a-legacy-to-help-keep-animals-alive-bendigo-advertiser/ news, national, She dedicated her life to animals while she was alive, and now the legacy of golden girl Betty White is helping to keep kittens safe in Australia. A cat rescue group in the NSW area is appealing for donations in honor of the actress as what would have been her 100th birthday rolls […]]]>

news, national,

She dedicated her life to animals while she was alive, and now the legacy of golden girl Betty White is helping to keep kittens safe in Australia. A cat rescue group in the NSW area is appealing for donations in honor of the actress as what would have been her 100th birthday rolls around on Sunday. Robyn Macari, volunteer and coordinator of Tamworth’s Brighter Future Cat Rescue, said the fundraiser would give them the opportunity to receive much-needed support while honoring a global icon. “Betty White was a fan of animals and a beloved personality for many of us,” she said. “We accept donations any day of the week, but this was just something to give to Betty White.” With the mission statement “every life matters,” donations received on Jan. 17, White’s birthday, will be used to purchase food and bedding to ease the financial pressure on volunteer foster families. “Some foster families just can’t afford it, they have the time, but they physically can’t afford to buy food and litter for extra cats and kittens,” he said. she declared. “It’s just ridiculous how much food we eat to support these babies.” For families looking for new furry friends, Brighter Future adoption prices are set at $250, but Macari said grooming cats for adoption can often cost thousands of dollars. “Adoption fees only cover veterinary work,” she said. “If they’re sick or injured…the adoption costs don’t come close.” Ms Macari hopes more people will get on board and said the group also aims to give back to the community by offering a discounted microchip to keep all animals safe. “Instead of doing it at the vets for $30, they can pay $10 and hopefully that will help identify more animals in our community,” she said. With seven foster homes located around Tamworth, Ms Macari said while they would like more volunteers, that would mean more resources, which requires more money, which donations could help fund. “We could definitely do a lot more,” she said. Whether you’re a cat lover looking to adopt or a fan of Betty White, Ms Macari urged anyone with spare change to spare to help out. “They need us,” she said. “They just make you laugh and make you smile.”

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Need to ring or zoom? Edmonds teenager comes to the rescue https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/need-to-ring-or-zoom-edmonds-teenager-comes-to-the-rescue/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 09:30:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/need-to-ring-or-zoom-edmonds-teenager-comes-to-the-rescue/ EDMONDS – There’s someone out there to save the day for baby boomers who can’t connect their Ring doorbells or bring their tablets to Zoom. Jack Rice to the rescue. What’s up with this? Jack, 17, is a kid from Edmonds-Woodway High School who helps seniors with technology. He gives free sessions at senior centers, […]]]>

EDMONDS – There’s someone out there to save the day for baby boomers who can’t connect their Ring doorbells or bring their tablets to Zoom.

Jack Rice to the rescue.

What’s up with this?

Jack, 17, is a kid from Edmonds-Woodway High School who helps seniors with technology.

He gives free sessions at senior centers, over the phone, and even does home visits – at no cost.

It will show you how to set up devices, send text, share photos, surf the net, whatever you need. Another of his “Seniors’ Guide to Smartphones 101” presentations is coming soon to the Edmonds Waterfront Center.

I put him to the test: he came to my house and solved my digital distress. Thanks to Jack, I can see who’s at the door on my smartphone and my smart fridge.

“It’s a simple thing, just to be a kid and grow up with technology,” he said.

At 13, Jack started the association Bridge, which stands for Bridging Roads into Different Generations.

Jack Rice (left) gives his grandmother Carolyn Rice a tutorial on her new tablet. (Kevin Clark / The Messenger)

“After spending a lot of time over the summer with my grandparents, I realized that they needed a lot of help with the technology,” he said.

“I corrected my grandfather’s email and helped him determine if an email was a scam or not. I helped my grandmother install a Kindle. I installed their printer. It was easy for me to help my grandparents and make their life easier and I was able to get closer to them.

He didn’t stop there.

“I recognized that there is definitely a technological gap between the younger and older generations,” he said. “I had the idea to extend my services to a wider audience. ”

A few friends are also volunteering, and he hopes to recruit more.

Jack uses the money he earns from teaching reading and English to pay for gasoline. The tall, red-haired teenager also makes time to play basketball for a traveling team.

Jack Rice (left) gives his grandmother Carolyn Rice a tutorial on her new tablet.  (Kevin Clark / The Messenger)

Jack Rice (left) gives his grandmother Carolyn Rice a tutorial on her new tablet. (Kevin Clark / The Messenger)

He has helped the Edmonds Waterfront Center with a Verdant Health tablet program to equip seniors with access to telehealth.

“It was cool to see people who had never used a device before changing their lives with one,” Jack said. “The most important thing during the pandemic has been Zooming for talking to friends and family, and for health visits. ”

Center CEO Daniel Johnson said the elderly needed technical assistance.

“Jack is a hero around here,” Johnson said. “He is charming, knowledgeable and exceptionally patient. ”

Jack said it was mutual.

“I like to learn from the elderly,” he said. “They have a lot of wisdom to share with me and I love getting to know them. I have the impression of getting something out of it. ”

The learning curve for the elderly is not that steep.

“You get better with practice,” said Jack.

He trained a 95-year-old woman to use her first smartphone.

“And now she calls me every week,” he said. “Which is really cool.”

Contact Jack at jack@bridg.org, go to www.bridg.org or call the Edmonds Waterfront Center at 425-774-5555.

Andrea Brown: abrown@heraldnet.com; 425-339-3443. Twitter @reporterbrown.

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]]> Ida’s fire department launches shift week to handle calls https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/idas-fire-department-launches-shift-week-to-handle-calls/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 11:00:40 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/idas-fire-department-launches-shift-week-to-handle-calls/ Ida’s volunteer firefighter / EMT Drew Weiler sweeps the floors of the central office at Ida Station. The Ida Volunteer Fire Department will maintain a team of two firefighters Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the station. Ida’s volunteer firefighters / paramedics Drew Weiler (left) and Mike Komorowski inspect station equipment. Despite […]]]>

Ida’s volunteer firefighter / EMT Drew Weiler sweeps the floors of the central office at Ida Station.

The Ida Volunteer Fire Department will maintain a team of two firefighters Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the station.

The Ida Volunteer Fire Department will maintain a team of two firefighters Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the station.

Ida's volunteer firefighters / paramedics Drew Weiler (left) and Mike Komorowski inspect station equipment.

Ida’s volunteer firefighters / paramedics Drew Weiler (left) and Mike Komorowski inspect station equipment.

Despite his two jobs, Ida Township firefighter Drew Weiler knows the importance of being available when a fire call or emergency call arrives.

That’s why he stepped in when the township needed firefighters last week to staff the fire station during daylight hours, when many firefighters are working and not available to respond.

“I love being there, the atmosphere and taking calls,” said the Ida resident, 29, after working a day shift. “I’ve always liked it and public safety is something I’ve always wanted to do.”

He was one of five firefighters who signed up to work a day shift at the station and to respond to emergencies between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Other firefighters from other departments are also helping this month to help kick-start the effort.

“The day is always a struggle for us when the tones are ringing,” said Weiler, a Hillsdale County Sheriff’s Assistant. “Other guys have lives, families and jobs and can’t always get in. “

The only calls he and Mike Komorowski of the Bedford Fire Department had during their shift were for a medical rescue and someone in need of assistance getting to his home. Both were busy checking equipment, hoses, and air cylinders to make sure they were ready to go when needed.

A 2011 graduate of Ida High School, Weiler said he would work even without pay if necessary.

Ida Fire Chief Kirt Horn said the new day shift aims to provide enough staff for the service to respond to any emergency.

“It’s just us right now,” said Horn, a 26-year-old with the department, after working day one with Ida’s Captain Carl Arnold and Dundee’s Rob Justice. “I am happy that we have a (township) council that is proactive, supports us and is ready to listen to the needs of the community. Fire services are changing faster than we can keep up.

In the past, like other departments in Monroe County, Ida sometimes had only one or two people available to respond to a fire call or rescue on a weekday. After exploring the plan for the past two years, the department began staffing the station with two people last week to ensure there would be enough firefighters on site to deal with an emergency. The municipality pays firefighters a fixed fee per shift.

“We are all struggling in today’s environment,” said Horn, 49. “Daytime issues are real for most departments. The (lack of help) pushes you hard. We all work during the day and have a life outside of it. We just don’t have the volunteers we had. So we started to equip the station with two people to improve our response times during the day. We are trying to find a way to make it work. This ensures that someone will be available to make the calls. We haven’t had this for the past two years.

The chief was proud of how Ida’s small community and the department worked together to become big without raising new taxes.

“It’s a struggle to find funding (for a small town), I know,” Horn said. “You just need to do some homework.”

Ida has 24 paid duty firefighters in its workforce. He also enlisted firefighters from other departments in Bedford, Dundee, Summerfield and Ann Arbor Township to cover shifts, Horn said.

Ida handled nearly 600 calls in 2021, up about 120 from the previous year. About 60% of those calls were made during the day, he said. The department covers an area of ​​approximately 8,000 people.

“Remember, we also take care of half of Raisinville Township (south of the Raisin River),” said the Chief. “That’s why having these guys really helps us. “

The chef, who also works full-time as a heating and cooling technician at the University of Michigan Hospital in Ann Arbor, is the only paid member of the department.

He said the department and township had collaborated on how to pay firefighters for station staff without seeking additional funding.

“We figured out how to make it work,” Horn said.

The first week produced at least one call per day, all of which were medical runs, he said.

“It turned out as we expected,” he said. “Maybe we’ve started something that can help other departments struggling with the same.”

This article originally appeared on The Monroe News: Ida’s fire department launches shift week to handle calls


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North Shore Rescue has the busiest year ever, by far https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/north-shore-rescue-has-the-busiest-year-ever-by-far/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 17:35:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/north-shore-rescue-has-the-busiest-year-ever-by-far/ North Shore Rescue was called 226 times in 2021, breaking the previous annual record of 151 set last year. The team of all-volunteer professionals has set records in five of the past seven years, but this is by far the biggest increase in a single year. “It’s been a whirlwind,” said team leader Mike Danks. […]]]>

North Shore Rescue was called 226 times in 2021, breaking the previous annual record of 151 set last year.

The team of all-volunteer professionals has set records in five of the past seven years, but this is by far the biggest increase in a single year.

“It’s been a whirlwind,” said team leader Mike Danks. “With COVID, there are an awful lot of people going out in the backcountry – a lot of people doing it safely, but there will always be accidents. And that’s why we have a team.

Such high call volumes would once have overwhelmed volunteers, but in recent years they have shifted to using smaller ground crews and training new search managers and specialized rescue technicians to help share the workload.

“We created that capacity and we saw new leaders emerge,” said Danks, adding that morale has never been higher. “I think we are good.”

Another major difference was Talon Helicopters’ new Dolphin helicopter, which entered service at the end of 2020. Unlike the familiar yellow rescue helicopters, the Dauphin is equipped with a winch, making it easier for rescuers and patients to get in. air transport in wooded land. And pilots and researchers can fly using night vision capabilities, which has reduced the number of overnight stays in the backcountry. In 2021, they logged 154 hours with night vision goggles.

“[It] has been a game changer, ”Danks said.

The Dolphin also made them popular with other volunteer search and rescue teams, with 47 mutual aid calls from as far away as North Vancouver Island and Kelowna.

Danks said he would never consider turning down a request for help from another team. When the town of Merritt and the Fraser Valley flooded in November, the helicopter team safely evacuated dozens of stranded seniors, families and pets.

“We were constantly pushing and saying, ‘Hey, we’re available. We can go. Please put us in it. And when we were finally able to go out there and help, it was a proud moment for all of us and for Talon as well, ”he said. “It was an experience I will never forget.”

The team added seven new recruits in 2021 – nine if you include Neiko and Dreki, two dogs accredited for search and rescue in July. The team’s three dogs spent a combined 101 hours in the field in 2021.

And North Shore Rescue has never been so crowded with medical professionals, which means rescue subjects receive the best possible care in the field, Danks said.

In 2021, three searches resulted in deaths: a snowshoer who went missing overnight off House Sound Crest Trail in January, a hiker who fell when he separated from a friend in the regional park of Lynn Headwaters in May and a man who suffered a medical emergency just steps from the Grouse Mountain parking lot during the June thermal dome.

While Danks said he was proud of the way 2021 has unfolded for its members, the year ended on a sad note. Karl Winter, one of the three founding members of North Shore Rescue, died on December 31 at the age of 82.

Winter served North Shore Rescue for 57 years. When he no longer went out into the bush for lost or injured hikers, he remained active for the team on construction and maintenance projects, administrative work, public events, fundraising and mentoring new ones. members, Danks said.

“Karl was just a legendary man. It was a mountain of men, ”he said. “He wouldn’t look for any credit. He was incredibly strong. He was patient with everyone.

In 2022, the team hopes to begin rebuilding its Capilano Gate search and rescue base, but Danks said their top priority for the year will be lobbying the province to allow it to use the capabilities of lifting of the Dolphin after dark. They have all the necessary federal approvals, but the province has been stubbornly approving it, Danks said.

“We have this amazing tool but… we are not allowed to use it. Like, there’s a restriction on this plane that doesn’t need to be there, ”he said. “We know this will make a huge difference not only to the safety of our rescuers, but also to the safety of the public we serve. It just drastically reduces the number of people we have to field overnight on technical terrain. “

From the general public in 2022, all Danks asks for is their continued support and willingness to share a trail safety education that helps ensure everyone gets in and out of the mountains without needing help. from North Shore Rescue.

“We are so lucky. We have incredible support from our community, ”he said.


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“A legend of the mountain”: a founding member of North Shore Rescue has passed away https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/a-legend-of-the-mountain-a-founding-member-of-north-shore-rescue-has-passed-away/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 19:03:05 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/a-legend-of-the-mountain-a-founding-member-of-north-shore-rescue-has-passed-away/ One of the founding members of a well-known search and rescue organization in British Columbia has passed away. Karl Winter was not only an original member, but was the first team leader of North Shore Rescue (NSR) and has been described by those who knew him as a “legend of the mountain”. In one Facebook […]]]>

One of the founding members of a well-known search and rescue organization in British Columbia has passed away.

Karl Winter was not only an original member, but was the first team leader of North Shore Rescue (NSR) and has been described by those who knew him as a “legend of the mountain”.

In one Facebook post, North Shore Rescue said Winter died on December 31, 2021 of natural causes.

The post shares a few stories about Winter’s contribution to the mountain rescue community, described by Gerry Brewer, another founding member of NSR.

Winter was born in Germany, but soon after arriving in British Columbia he joined the Mountain Rescue Group and the Alpine Club of Canada.

“Within three years of arriving, with no English, (Winter) was teaching mountaineering skills and leading club climbs,” says Brewer.

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Summit of the North Coast named after Tim Jones


North Shore Summit named after Tim Jones – January 21, 2017

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‘Conditions have changed’: BC rescuers warn of increased risks in backcountry

Brewer describes some of Winter’s incredible rescues and accomplishments.

He was trapped for three days in a snow cave on Mount McKinley and was able to descend in chest-deep snow to retrieve supplies from their buried tent. Everyone survived.

In 1965, he was sent to Granduc Yukon after avalanches buried a mining camp. Twenty-eight men died in the tragedy.

That same year, Winter and a friend responded to an ad asking people to volunteer for a civil defense group. It was this meeting that marked the beginning of NSR.

“He then took us from a group of ‘bushwhackers’, as he called us, to the early days of a mountain rescue group,” Brewer wrote.

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Winter and his wife Mary went on to become Saint Bernard dog breeders and were recognized by Smithsonian Magazine as top breeders.

“(Winter’s) mountaineering skills were tested frequently over the more than 35 years he was an active member of the NSR,” Brewer wrote.

“Many owe a debt of gratitude to his efforts.”

Winter and his wife had two sons and eventually four grandchildren.

As of December 29, North Shore Rescue had been called up to 223 tasks in 2021 alone.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.


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Colwood Fire Rescue marks 75 years of service to the community – Victoria News https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/colwood-fire-rescue-marks-75-years-of-service-to-the-community-victoria-news/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/colwood-fire-rescue-marks-75-years-of-service-to-the-community-victoria-news/ Colwood Fire Rescue Acting Fire Chief Greg Chow stands next to a fire truck used by the department from 1957 to 1977, now restored and on display in the department museum. 2021 marked the department’s 75th anniversary. (Justin Samanski-Langille / Press staff) A bicycle hangs from the ceiling of the Colwood Fire Rescue Museum. Acting […]]]>
Colwood Fire Rescue Acting Fire Chief Greg Chow stands next to a fire truck used by the department from 1957 to 1977, now restored and on display in the department museum. 2021 marked the department’s 75th anniversary. (Justin Samanski-Langille / Press staff)
A bicycle hangs from the ceiling of the Colwood Fire Rescue Museum.  Acting Fire Chief Greg Chow said the bike was used by one of the department's founding members to answer calls.  (Justin Samanski-Langille / Press staff)A bicycle hangs from the ceiling of the Colwood Fire Rescue Museum. Acting Fire Chief Greg Chow said the bike was used by one of the department’s founding members to answer calls. (Justin Samanski-Langille / Press staff)
Historic equipment used by Colwood Fire Rescue can be seen in the Department Museum, 2021 marking the Department's 75th anniversary.  (Justin Samanski-Langille / Press staff)Historic equipment used by Colwood Fire Rescue can be seen in the Department Museum, 2021 marking the Department’s 75th anniversary. (Justin Samanski-Langille / Press staff)
The first firefighter clothes used by Colwood Fire Rescue are on display in the Department Museum, 2021 marking the Department's 75th anniversary.  (Justin Samanski-Langille / Press staff)The first firefighter clothes used by Colwood Fire Rescue are on display in the Department Museum, 2021 marking the Department’s 75th anniversary. (Justin Samanski-Langille / Press staff)

On June 12, 1946, Colwood Fire Rescue was officially formed, forever changing the lives of residents for the better.

Seventy-five years later, much has changed with the ministry, but its mission remains the same: to protect the people of Colwood.

“We are the oldest fire department on the West Coast,” Acting Fire Chief Greg Chow said. “It’s amazing to just recognize the fact that we’ve been around for 75 years… today, looking back, we definitely have a department to be proud of. “

Chow said the department was unable to properly celebrate the milestone over the summer as the pandemic was still raging, and their attention was focused on honoring the late Fire Chief John Cassidy. of a heart attack this month. But now, as 2021 draws to a close, Chow has been able to introduce Black Press to the history of the department with the help of his museum.

“We started in 1939 as an Air Raid Protection District, then moved to Colwood Fire Prevention District in 1946,” Chow said, among the department’s historic amenities.

Originally armed with fire hoses and pump trailers borrowed from the federal government, the fledgling organization made its first vehicle purchase in 1942 – an open-top truck purchased from a local market gardener.

Chow said that over the years members of the department would include many well-known Colwood families, including the Ridleys, Emerys and his own family, who have had volunteer members for the department since 1952.

“Becoming a firefighter is a lifelong dream for some people,” said Chow. “Some people like to use this as a springboard for their careers; others just want to serve their community.

The years will also be marked by several major fires that the department will have to fight, including one that will destroy the road sawmill in 1952, but the neighboring wooden buildings were saved thanks to the efforts of the department. On April 1, 1961, the first of several major fires at Colwood Plaza would ignite. Once again, the ministry’s efforts would succeed in saving the neighboring buildings.

As Colwood grew and became busier, so did his firefighters. Chow said when he first joined the department in 1982, they got around 100 calls a year. Today, they receive on average between 600 and 700 calls per year.

“It’s not just fires, but medical procedures, car crashes, confined space rescues, dive rescues, that sort of thing, too.” Chow said the most significant changes the department has seen over the years, and the best presented in the museum, are changes to their equipment. At first, volunteers fought the fires with nothing more than a thick coat, basic helmet and rubber boots. Their equipment was nothing more than trucks with basic pumps, hoses, and hand tools.

Over the years, a firefighter’s clothing would evolve rapidly to offer much more protection, while their equipment would become much larger, more complex, more efficient and better suited to the needs of the growing community.

Today, change continues to happen. Chow said the department will choose a new permanent leader in 2022; a second fire station is planned to improve response times as the city develops; and the ministry can also move away from its volunteer model to adopt a more full-time staff structure to better meet demand.


@JSamanski
justin.samanski-langille@goldstreamgazette.com
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