Rescue Volunteer – Owl And Monkey Haven http://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 06:43:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Rescue Volunteer – Owl And Monkey Haven http://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/ 32 32 The story of the Nickerson fire begins and continues with the Sterling Fire Department https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/the-story-of-the-nickerson-fire-begins-and-continues-with-the-sterling-fire-department/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 06:14:12 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/the-story-of-the-nickerson-fire-begins-and-continues-with-the-sterling-fire-department/ STERLING – For Robert Nickerson, his road started in Sterling … and brings him back. Nickerson recently joined the Sterling Fire Department full time, having started his career here. Nickerson started his career as a volunteer EMT with Sterling EMS in 1994 and has kept his hand in the department all those years. “I continued […]]]>

STERLING – For Robert Nickerson, his road started in Sterling … and brings him back.

Nickerson recently joined the Sterling Fire Department full time, having started his career here.

Nickerson started his career as a volunteer EMT with Sterling EMS in 1994 and has kept his hand in the department all those years.

“I continued to volunteer until I returned to school and obtained my Paramedic Certification in 2000, then immediately began training as a firefighter. I was hired in 2003 as a Sterling’s first full-time paramedic, ”he said.

His career has taken him to many areas of service, including one that deals with water rather than fire.

“I quickly joined the Sterling Dive Team and became a certified lifeguard diver, and still am today,” said Nickerson. “Shortly thereafter, I was hired as a part-time paramedic by UMass / Memorial Worcester EMS, providing advanced life-saving assistance to the City of Worcester.”


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Eagle County Pride hosts the first Big Gay Give Back Day https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/eagle-county-pride-hosts-the-first-big-gay-give-back-day/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 16:56:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/eagle-county-pride-hosts-the-first-big-gay-give-back-day/ Eagle County Pride Committee with the emcee at this year’s Pride in the Park. From left: Dennis Martin, Maddy Partridge, Justin Chesney, Britny Rose (MC), Jordan Lyles, Orlando Ortiz.Justin chesney On Saturday, Eagle County Pride is hosting its first Big Gay Giveback Day, which invites members of the LGBTQ + community and their allies to […]]]>

Eagle County Pride Committee with the emcee at this year’s Pride in the Park. From left: Dennis Martin, Maddy Partridge, Justin Chesney, Britny Rose (MC), Jordan Lyles, Orlando Ortiz.
Justin chesney

On Saturday, Eagle County Pride is hosting its first Big Gay Giveback Day, which invites members of the LGBTQ + community and their allies to spend the day volunteering together at Mountain Valley Horse Rescue in McCoy.

Eagle County Pride (ECP) formed during Pride Month last summer to host the first-ever pride celebration in Valley Park. Over the past year, ECP has continued to create opportunities for the local LGBTQ + community to connect through its online Facebook page and various in-person social events.

Justin Chesney moved to the valley about three years ago and became a member of the founding committee of ECP last summer.



“When I first came here I was meeting LGBTQ + ladies and gentlemen who live in the valley, but there was never really a place to go that you know to be 100% open and accepting, and there was never really a place to go that you knew to be 100% open and accepting. Certainly there were no events that were geared towards this sector of the community, ”Chesney said. “What we heard as we were preparing for the first Pride in the Park, and especially the second, is that a lot of the LGBTQ + community around this valley is really yearning for that connection, to have these places. sure to meet like-minded people.

The committee meets weekly to plan events and agendas to foster connection and representation from members of the ECP community, and hosted a Queer Coffee and Cocktails event at Two Arrows Coffee & Bar in Vail Village on the last Wednesday of each. month.



“It’s really cool bringing people together,” Chesney said. “It’s a smaller place, so it’s a more intimate group, but it works great for meeting people and socializing.”

Eagle County Pride hosts a Queer Coffee and Cocktails event at Two Arrows Coffee & Bar in Vail Village on the last Wednesday of each month.
Justin chesney

This Saturday will be the first time that the ECP will host the Big Gay Give Back Day, which combines community ties with meaningful volunteer work in the valley.

“We wanted to do some kind of give back to the community, and I used to work with Marleen [Bosch Hopkins, MVHR Director of Resources], who has been involved with Mountain Valley Horse Rescue for many years, ”said Chesney. “When the committee started talking about what kind of charity events we could do, I knew we absolutely had to contact her to become a partner.”

Volunteer Day will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the Mountain Valley Horse Rescue (MVHR) Ranch in McCoy, during which volunteers will participate in a series of tasks that support MVHR’s mission to rescue, rehabilitate and relocate the abused. , neglected and abandoned. horses.

“We do any necessary upgrades, cleaning or maintenance on the ranch, but it’s not too difficult,” Chesney said. “It could be anything, like cleaning the stalls, feeding the horses, cleaning up the trash, the last time we were there my fiancé Dennis put up a fence. It’s a good little exercise, but it sure won’t be something that will overwork you.

Volunteers will participate in a range of tasks that support MVHR’s mission to rescue, rehabilitate and relocate abused, neglected and abandoned horses. Here, Justin Chesney cleans up trash from the ranch.
Justin chesney

LGBTQ + people of all ages are invited to participate in the first Big Gay Give Back Day, as well as community allies. Chesney said making connections between all age groups is an important goal of the PCE.

“This is something that we are focusing on is making sure that we have positive visibility for the younger generation so that they kind of have a framework established for them, and don’t feel pressured to find their way alone, ”Chesney said. . “Especially for high school kids, seeing the adults who are in the community and who are open and proud, it really has an effect on them and on their ability to feel more comfortable being themselves. authentic. “

Big Gay Give Back Day begins at 9 a.m. this Saturday, September 25 at 33933 Colorado River Road in McCoy, Colorado. For more information on this event and to stay up to date on future ECP events, visit the Eagle County Pride Facebook Page.


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Youghal RNLI comes to the rescue of a lone sailor after he fell overboard https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/youghal-rnli-comes-to-the-rescue-of-a-lone-sailor-after-he-fell-overboard/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 09:32:54 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/youghal-rnli-comes-to-the-rescue-of-a-lone-sailor-after-he-fell-overboard/ Youghal RNLI volunteers came to the rescue of a lone sailor yesterday after he fell overboard from a yacht in the harbor. The lifeboat was launched at 4:10 p.m. following reports that the sailor had been in trouble in the water. The man had fallen overboard of the yacht while trying to free a rope […]]]>

Youghal RNLI volunteers came to the rescue of a lone sailor yesterday after he fell overboard from a yacht in the harbor.

The lifeboat was launched at 4:10 p.m. following reports that the sailor had been in trouble in the water.

The man had fallen overboard of the yacht while trying to free a rope that had caught around the 28-foot ship’s propeller.

The sailor managed to get back on board the yacht where he then sounded the alarm.

The lifeboat arrived at the scene to find crews from two local fishing boards already assisting the man.



Youghal RNLI at sea.

Two RNLI crew members boarded the boat and assessed the victim who was then taken aboard the lifeboat and brought back to shore where he encountered a family member waiting for him.

The sailor required no further medical treatment and his vessel was towed to its nearby mooring and moored.

Mark Nolan, Youghal RNLI’s volunteer deputy launching authority, said after the call: “The tragedy was averted today because this gentleman had the good sense to wear a life jacket and wear some form of communication. .

“If he had not, the result could have been much more serious. I would also like to thank the crew of the two local ships who were the first on the scene and who came to their aid today.”


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Logan County man spends more than two decades in service https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/logan-county-man-spends-more-than-two-decades-in-service/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 17:00:22 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/logan-county-man-spends-more-than-two-decades-in-service/ If there was anyone the residents of Corley would want when they need it, it’s Shane Molton. A 20-year veteran of Logan County’s Emergency Management Services, Molton has held a number of positions including search and rescue missions. In these situations, he “gets the job done in the fastest and most efficient way,” said Nathan […]]]>

If there was anyone the residents of Corley would want when they need it, it’s Shane Molton.

A 20-year veteran of Logan County’s Emergency Management Services, Molton has held a number of positions including search and rescue missions.

In these situations, he “gets the job done in the fastest and most efficient way,” said Nathan Thrailkill, who has made numerous calls with Molton.

Molton began working with the Search and Rescue Team as well as a Dive Search Team during their training in 2009, although the two disbanded a few years ago.

His wife Carla said Molton searched Mount Magazine for lost hikers. He also took people to hospital after tornadoes.

“So he did a bit of everything,” Carla Molton said.


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San Diego Small Animal Rescue Adopts Itty Bitty Pets – NBC 7 San Diego https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/san-diego-small-animal-rescue-adopts-itty-bitty-pets-nbc-7-san-diego/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 05:01:19 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/san-diego-small-animal-rescue-adopts-itty-bitty-pets-nbc-7-san-diego/ Adding a new pet to the home is always a joyful experience, and anyone looking to adopt a small pet won’t need to look any further than here in San Diego. Wee Companions is a college town-based rescue dedicated to pint-sized creatures in need of their furry homes. From guinea pigs, hamsters, chinchillas and rats, […]]]>

Adding a new pet to the home is always a joyful experience, and anyone looking to adopt a small pet won’t need to look any further than here in San Diego.

Wee Companions is a college town-based rescue dedicated to pint-sized creatures in need of their furry homes. From guinea pigs, hamsters, chinchillas and rats, this local nonprofit is ready to place small pets in loving and responsible homes.

“We save them or we welcome them, the unwanted ones,” said Wee Companions president Fenella Speece. “We rehabilitate them and decide if they can go for adoption. We find them homes or otherwise we give them sanctuary for the rest of their lives.

What started as a passionate speaking project in 1998 has evolved into a voluntary organization that acts as a refuge for small animals. Speece said the rescue began as a local effort soon after moving to San Diego when her husband was stationed in America’s most beautiful city. She networked with other like-minded people who were equally dedicated to saving small animals and finding perfect homes for them and in 2003 they were officially recognized as a 501 (c ) (3).

Back when Wee Companions started, there really was no other organization like this. There were dedicated rescues for dogs, cats, rabbits, and reptiles, and local animal shelters housed small animals, but there was no organization dedicated solely to small pets.

“I was like ‘someone has to step in and take care of these little ones,” Speece told NBC 7.

Since its inception, the organization has grown considerably to offer services other than adoption.

In addition to placing small pets in committed homes, Wee Companions operates a store in University City that sells pet food, toys, and small pet supplies. There, the organization also offers grooming services where small animals can get a basic checkup, nail clipping and other treatments.

Parents of pets going on vacation can leave their young at Wee Companions for their small animal boarding service.

Speece added that the organization is working diligently to educate the public about the good needs of small pets and help families understand that small pets can be a wonderful and valuable addition to responsible households.

Dogs can react badly to their diet or to a bad attitude towards an owner – so sometimes pet owners turn to “animal communicators” like Lydia Hiby to figure out what’s going on.

“I think there is a complete disconnect between owning an animal and being responsible for this life, for this little animal,” she said. “When you pick up a relatively inexpensive animal from a pet store, that doesn’t mean that creature isn’t of great value in the lessons it can teach you. It is 100% dependent on your care and kindness, and not everyone understands that. “

She also wants to remind owners of small pets that when they adopt a pet, regardless of size, they are committing themselves to a lifetime. With more people returning to their workspaces and children returning to classrooms, dozens of pets adopted under stay-at-home orders issued at the height of the pandemic have returned to homes. animal shelters.

Such a move tests countless resources of rescues and their ability to accommodate new animals.

“Small animal rescues are in crisis due to the collateral damage from COVID,” Spece said. “We’re packed and beyond. We are receiving more and more requests to welcome unwanted animals.

Those wishing to adopt and commit to a small animal from Wee Companions can contact the organization via email, Facebook or Instagram. From there, future pet parents will be put in touch with a representative.


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Wildlife rescue rehabilitates injured animals | Local News https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/wildlife-rescue-rehabilitates-injured-animals-local-news/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 15:13:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/wildlife-rescue-rehabilitates-injured-animals-local-news/ From a modest trailer near the end of an obscure road in Homosassa, Nature World Wildlife Rescue offers one last chance at freedom for the roughly 500 wild animals it tries every year to save from broken wings, dislocated limbs, and disease infections. bugs and other traumas they’ve suffered. Prior to COVID, approximately 1,200 wild […]]]>

From a modest trailer near the end of an obscure road in Homosassa, Nature World Wildlife Rescue offers one last chance at freedom for the roughly 500 wild animals it tries every year to save from broken wings, dislocated limbs, and disease infections. bugs and other traumas they’ve suffered.

Prior to COVID, approximately 1,200 wild animals were assessed and treated each year by the all-volunteer staff of the nonprofit group founded in 1985 by the former Homosassa Springs Nature World attraction and vets KC Nayfield and Mark Lowe of Midway Animal Hospital in Homosassa.

Today, Mary Opall owns the property, holds the permits and is the manager of the facility, which she says is the only stand-alone wildlife rescue in an eight-county region. Sure, there are other rescues out there, but they mostly operate in people’s backyards, according to Opall.

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Nature World primarily deals with birds, amphibians, and animals such as squirrels, bobcats, foxes, deer, otters, rabbits, armadillos, possums, turtles, and turtles. They don’t save alligators or snakes.

The group is funded by donations. He does not receive money from the government. This makes it difficult to pay the $ 30,000 per year it costs to feed the animals being rehabilitated, let alone utility and supply bills, and other costs.

Still, the facility saved enough money to modernize its building. Nature World volunteers expect another single-width trailer to be installed soon, but it would be nice if they could upgrade to double-width, they said.

Meanwhile, the volunteers are content to tend to their furry and feathered visitors to see what they can do to get the animals released into the wild.

“My passion is to see them come out,” Opall said. “It’s a success, that’s for sure.”

Not all animals can be released. Some must be euthanized because their injuries are too serious. Others who wouldn’t survive in the wild but who, nonetheless, could make a success of their lives with a bit of TLC can become long-time residents and be part of Nature World’s animal menagerie used to educate children and the general public on how to respect wildlife.

Nature World is working closely with veterinarians to assess and treat the animals and to determine which ones can be saved, the volunteers said.

“You have to do what’s best for the animals,” Bussiere said.

Before COVID, volunteers took some of the animals with them when they gave lectures in schools or set up stands at festivals in the area.

Things have been a little calmer since the pandemic took hold – but not so calm.

On a recent Saturday, Sonja Bussiere, who is the group’s treasurer, was answering the phone and touring the area in her jeep, picking up five baby squirrels, four baby raccoons and a baby opossum.

Bussière rehabilitates Nature World’s raccoons and deer at her home.

On a recent visit to Nature World, there were all kinds of birds, waffle turtles, a coyote, and at least one baby raccoon in residence. Opal said the cast of animal characters is constantly changing.

And every turtle, bird, or animal has its own story, as do the people who work at the rescue, as well as those who call the facility and have spotted a struggling animal.

Bussiere, Opall and volunteer Christina Hunley spoke of a semiconductor passing through Ocala on the Interstate. She spotted a stranded red-tailed hawk, captured the bird, and put it in her truck. She phoned Nature World on her way to Arkansas.

She received advice on how to care for the falcon while she was on the road, and when she returned five days later, she drove the bird to Nature World.

“We took care of it, fattened it up and released it near Ocala,” Opall said.

Then there was the blind deer that fell into a gravel pit and was then patched up, the swan whose companion died who was coaxed to stop crying, and the turtles hit by cars whose shells fell apart. repair using surgical and safety screws. pins.

There was also the stranded young eagle with an eye problem.

A vet first assessed that the bird had a fungal infection and prescribed appropriate medication. When the eye did not improve, a volunteer said, “Let me see”.

Upon close inspection, the volunteer discovered a tick in a crease in the eagle’s eye. When the tick was removed and antibiotics prescribed, the eagle perked up and was quickly able to see, fly and be released.

Opall, Bussiere and Hunley also each have unique stories to tell about how they got involved in saving the lives of wild animals.

Opall met a woman from Nature World at a festival, who invited her to a meeting. Then the woman told Opall that they were going to save a young sandhill crane.

Opall said she led the woman near where the crane was spotted, and they looked and watched until suddenly the woman screamed, “There he is.”

Opall didn’t see him. She was looking for a baby bird near the ground.

“Or or?” she asked.

“Well he’s looking at you over that fence,” the woman said.

Opall then saw a fairly large crane. The women needed to catch the bird. But how?

Opall’s companion spotted two teenagers and convinced them to help.

The teens chased the bird onto someone’s porch and Opall threw a net at it. Then the woman from Nature World asked the teens to pack the bird up and carry it to the car. And they did.

Somehow, the team’s efforts and the success of the bird rescue convinced Opall that wildlife rescue was the path she was destined to take.

Bussiere recounted how she and her husband were driving along the Fort Island Trail when she saw an injured osprey. She jumped out of the car and approached the bird.

“Some guys looked at it and I said, ‘OK, I’ll take it. “”

She put the osprey in a box and called Opall.

Opall told him to bring the bird to the rescue.

Bussiere thought she had just put the bird down. But Opall asked, “Where are you going?”

Opall needed help holding the bird and removing the bugs from it.

Bussière helped and got hooked. And the bird was rehabilitated and released.

Hunley tells a similar story about Opall’s ability to attract volunteers through hard love.

Hunley was working on construction and his crew cut down a tree near Homosassa Elementary School. One of the men Hunley worked with called her and told her there had been a nest of baby squirrels in the tree.

Hunley brought the little critters home and did what she could to feed them. After days had passed, she called Opall to come and assess when the squirrels could be released.

“Mary leaned in for a laugh,” Hunley said.

Why?

“They were the biggest and biggest squirrels,” Opall said. “They were so ready to go.”

Undeterred by Opall’s laughter, Hunley asked if she could help Nature World.

This team of volunteers is always on the lookout for more hands to help. They might need help most days of the week. And they said if people are a little afraid of feeding and caring for wildlife, there is always a need for cleaning and other chores.

They could also hire someone to help them with paperwork and grant writing.

And while they focus on wildlife, their efforts have benefited teens as well.

Nature World works with adolescents in the juvenile justice system who are assigned to community service.

“We treat them (the teenagers) with respect, and the animals take them out,” Opall said.

Bussiere said some of the students went to college and studied related subjects, such as biology.

Opall spoke of a man who thanked her for helping his son, but instead fired him, not seeking praise. Then he grabbed her arms, looked her in the eye and said, “Thank you. You saved my son.

The teenager had been referred to Nature World by the court.

“I treat them just like they’re my grandchildren,” Opall said. “They will come back later and bring their wives and children.”

Opall said one of her desires is to show that she and her volunteers care as much about wildlife rescue as the founders of Rescue.

“I hope to make them proud,” she said.

Bussiere and Hunley have stated that Opall certainly does just that.

“Marie is the heart and soul of it all,” said Bussière.

Nature World Wildlife Rescue can be contacted at 352-621-5575.


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New Santa Ana | The OC Rescue Mission is in urgent need of donated diapers, pull-ups and wet wipes https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/new-santa-ana-the-oc-rescue-mission-is-in-urgent-need-of-donated-diapers-pull-ups-and-wet-wipes/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 01:17:27 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/new-santa-ana-the-oc-rescue-mission-is-in-urgent-need-of-donated-diapers-pull-ups-and-wet-wipes/ Orange County, California – Orange County Rescue Mission There is a great need for wet wipes for toddlers and toddlers, mainly in size 5 and 6 diapers, and 3T-4T boys and girls diapers and the Village of Hope, a center of life. transition for rescue missions. Has been announced. A homeless family in Orange County. […]]]>

Orange County, California – Orange County Rescue Mission There is a great need for wet wipes for toddlers and toddlers, mainly in size 5 and 6 diapers, and 3T-4T boys and girls diapers and the Village of Hope, a center of life. transition for rescue missions. Has been announced. A homeless family in Orange County. Nonprofits are calling on the community to donate the above baby products to reach the goal of 77,250 baby products. These important donations help ensure that homeless parents and children can safely rely on the daily necessities they need for their growing children throughout the year.

Rescue missions provide an average of 270,000 diapers and pull-ups and 600,000 wipes each year to homeless families with children. “Rescue missions continue to require diapers of all sizes, but there is now a significant need for retractable diapers and size 5 and 6 diapers,” said the chairman of the Orange County Rescue Mission. Jim Palmer said. “We have received generous donations from the community for diapers for newborns and small babies, but the continued need for full size diapers and diapers is often underestimated. “

The increase in homelessness due to the pandemic is contributing to this continued need. Rescue missions continue to provide shelter and supplies to those in need, as well as community support.

Considering the uncertainties surrounding the current situation of the eviction of the peasants, it is very important that the organization prepares and stores baby infant products in Hope Village.

“We are especially grateful for the incredible support the community has shown us over the past year and a half. Babies and toddlers living in Hope Village have the supplies and items they need for their well-being. We invite anyone who can participate by helping them get in, ”says Palmer.

Those wishing to donate or organize a diaper drive can drop off the donation at the desired village during the Orange County Rescue Mission. 1 Hope Drive, Tustin, California, 92782.. Donations can also be purchased online and delivered to this address. See below for more information. https://www.rescuemission.org/urgent-baby-needs/..

The donation warehouse is open Monday to Sunday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

About the Orange County Rescue Mission

The goals of the Orange County Rescue Mission are guidance, counseling, education, job training, housing, food, clothing, healthcare and independent living communities.

The Rescue Mission was founded in 1963 as a faith-based organization. Since then, Rescue Missions has shared hope with the desperate in Orange County through Jesus Christ. Our program is designed to provide comprehensive services that empower homeless men, women, veterans and children. His dedication to the program and beyond has given the organization a lot of recognition, including Charity Navigator’s highest rating of 4 stars.

To donate or inquire about volunteer opportunities on the Orange County Rescue Mission, please contact (714) 247-4300 or visit: www.rescuemission.org..

The Orange County Rescue Mission is a significant need for 3T-4T Boys and Girls Wet Diapers and Wipes for toddlers and toddlers living primarily in size 5 and 6 diapers and the Mission of Village of Hope transition rescue. Has been announced. A center of life for homeless families in Orange County.

New Santa Ana | The OC Rescue Mission is in urgent need of donated diapers, pull-ups and wet wipes Source link New Santa Ana | The OC Rescue Mission is in urgent need of donated diapers, pull-ups and wet wipes


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New Fire Truck in Service in Dennis Township | Local News https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/new-fire-truck-in-service-in-dennis-township-local-news/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 14:30:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/new-fire-truck-in-service-in-dennis-township-local-news/ The Ocean View Volunteer Fire Company recently commissioned a new 2021 Pierce Rescue Pump. The Ocean View Volunteer Fire Company recently commissioned a new 2021 Pierce Rescue Pump. The Ocean View Volunteer Fire Company recently commissioned a new 2021 Pierce Rescue Pump. Sequoia National Park was closed and its namesake gigantic trees were potentially threatened […]]]>

Sequoia National Park was closed and its namesake gigantic trees were potentially threatened on Tuesday as two wildfires burned down on steep and dangerous terrain in California’s Sierra Nevada.



TOWNSHIP OF DENNIS – Ocean View Volunteer Fire Company Has New Truck; a Pierce 2021 rescue pump delivered on September 9.

The pump was put into operation over the weekend, “after our members had completed several days of training to ensure that all qualified operators can use the equipment safely and efficiently,” said Adam Dotts , deputy head of the company.

It will replace two pieces of equipment, a 2005 pumper and a 2001 rescue truck, and will have the equipment and perform the same functions as both, Dotts said.

The Dennis Township Fire District purchased the truck for $ 85,000, which includes a deduction for the trade-in of other devices.

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The new truck will be designated “Squad 17” and will be housed at the South Seaville Fire Hall on Main Street. It carries 730 gallons of water and 20 gallons of fire fighting foam.

WILDWOOD – In 2001 Daniel Speigel was a firefighter in Wildwood and a member of Urban Sear…

“The compressed air foam system makes the water carried on the truck more efficient, which is especially important in our area which is not served by hydrants,” Dotts said.

The truck will also carry hydraulic mining equipment, which is often used to free people trapped in vehicles after severe wrecks. According to Dotts, these are battery-powered, which will allow for better mobility than the old equipment, which required hoses from the truck.


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Loudoun County Fire Considerations Horse Show Ground for New Philomont Volunteer Fire Department | New https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/loudoun-county-fire-considerations-horse-show-ground-for-new-philomont-volunteer-fire-department-new/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/loudoun-county-fire-considerations-horse-show-ground-for-new-philomont-volunteer-fire-department-new/ Loudoun County Combined Fire & Rescue said it was considering recommending to the supervisory board the construction of the Philomont Volunteer Fire Department on the former horse show ground, located less than half a mile from the station. The recommendation was included in a feasibility study shared on September 9 with more than 30 people […]]]>

Loudoun County Combined Fire & Rescue said it was considering recommending to the supervisory board the construction of the Philomont Volunteer Fire Department on the former horse show ground, located less than half a mile from the station.

The recommendation was included in a feasibility study shared on September 9 with more than 30 people attending the second county-hosted public information meeting for the project, held at Woodgrove High School.

Some residents said they were not happy with the process or the study, which included recommending staff to use the old equestrian fairground for a new station. If the property of the existing station is not to be used by the county in any other way, staff recommended the demolition of the existing facility and the construction of a new facility.

“We want career staff to have a safe and efficient fire hall with the necessary amenities, but on a smaller scale,” said Madeline Skinner, former owner of the Philomont general store which is adjacent to the fire hall.

Skinner urges county staff to delay further action until the community is satisfied the design meets the needs of the historic rural village.

The station’s proposal, which is located at 36560 Jeb Stuart Road in Purcellville, was evaluated and had several shortcomings by county and national standards. The request for a new station came before the Supervisory Board in 2017.

County officials said the original station and subsequent additions were not built or designed to allow for 24-hour occupancy and operations. As a result, fire and rescue officials say the station is lacking. of programmatic spaces needed to support staff living and working in the building, in a safe and efficient manner. Inadequate changing rooms and shower rooms as well as dormitories and non-compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act are among the shortcomings, according to county officials.

The results of the feasibility study will be presented to the supervisory board in October, according to county staff. The study included four projects, including the renovation of the existing facility, the demolition and construction of a new station, and the combination of the fire station with the adjacent community center.

The county’s capital improvement plan budget for the project is $ 21,856,000, which is lower than the costs of the feasibility study projects, according to county staff.

The department-owned Horse Show Grounds have several benefits, including eliminating the need for a temporary station and changing the ownership of the adjacent community center, according to Keith Johnson, head of the Combined Fire and Rescue System. of Loudoun County.

In addition, the construction of a fire station allows a single story station, a traditional septic system, shorter construction time, provides flexibility in the layout of the design, and the cost is within the project budget.

Supervisor Tony Buffington (R-Blue Ridge), who represents the area, was on hand for the briefing.






Supervisor Tony Buffington (R-Blue Ridge) speaking at the September 9 public briefing regarding the future of the Philomont Fire and Rescue Station.




“The only thing that escapes me is doing nothing,” Buffington told guests.

“Doing nothing for me is not an option,” he said. “I’ve seen a lot of signs that say ‘let’s save $ 22 million and do nothing’, and for me that’s not an option.”

If the council goes ahead, a public hearing will be scheduled on the preliminary options of the architectural concept.

Supporters of building a new fire station said a new facility is needed to keep up with population growth in the region.

John Myers, president of the Loudoun Career Fire Fighters Association, said he supports the construction of a fire station on alternative land.

He said firefighters spend a third of their lives in a fire station and the current station is unsafe, with steep stairs and an inadequate exhaust gas capture system at the station that can lead to cancer.

“Trying to renovate the current station or put a new one in the same location is a bad choice and we shouldn’t have to create a space to work,” Myers said.

Johnson said the feasibility study raises concerns for members. He said the study includes plans for building the station on two floors, which is a concern as well as the floor plan being intrusive and less efficient.

“We have program issues and gaps,” Johnson said.






Meet Philomont |  Johnson

Keith Johnson, Loudoun County Combined Fire and Rescue System Chief, during the public information session on September 9 on the future of the Philomont fire and rescue station.




“The feasibility study leaves us with more guesswork than a claim that our renovation and expansion can produce a facility that will meet our programmatic needs and provide a safe and efficient floor plan,” he said. . “Any renovation would consist of renovating the 63-year-old facility and bringing it up to today’s standards that we must meet, including ADA, [and] Fire prevention system. “

A mix of speakers spoke for and against the construction of the fire station.

Some said their concerns were about the size of devices in a rural area, and others were concerned about the potential threats of paving and road widening, and impacting the rustic view of the area.

One speaker asked staff to consider an alternate location for the station.

County officials said the proposed station – which would require seven acres of land – should be in the immediate area of ​​the current station.

The Snickersville Toll Highway serves as the main route for east-west travel through the community, with St. Louis Road and Silcott Springs Road serving as the main north-south route for the area.

More than 77 percent of residents in the Philomont area in November supported the county’s loan request, which included the costs of designing, building and equipping the replacement Volunteer Fire Department facility. Philomont.

The current station was built in 1956 and expanded twice and serves Philomont, Silcott Springs, Airmont, Unison, Foxcroft, Mountville and North Fork.

A decision on the station’s future will be submitted to the supervisory board on Oct. 5, according to county staff.


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Scruggs Volunteer Fire and Rescue honors 20th anniversary of September 11 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/scruggs-volunteer-fire-and-rescue-honors-20th-anniversary-of-september-11/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 21:03:00 +0000 https://owlandmonkeyhaven.co.uk/scruggs-volunteer-fire-and-rescue-honors-20th-anniversary-of-september-11/ FRANKLIN COUNTY, Va. (WDBJ) – At 8:46 am on September 11, 2001, the first plane struck the World Trade Center. In honor of the 20th anniversary of the attacks, Scruggs Volunteer Fire and Rescue turned on the lights and sirens on all of their vehicles at that time that morning. “We haven’t forgotten. It’s still […]]]>

FRANKLIN COUNTY, Va. (WDBJ) – At 8:46 am on September 11, 2001, the first plane struck the World Trade Center. In honor of the 20th anniversary of the attacks, Scruggs Volunteer Fire and Rescue turned on the lights and sirens on all of their vehicles at that time that morning.

“We haven’t forgotten. It’s still in our minds like it was yesterday. We have lost our brothers, and they represent what we do and it is one of those sad days that we have to relive, actually every year, in fact every day, ”said George Tawes, SVFR member.

For SVFR, September 11 hits home even more because one of their late members, Bill Kennedy, lost his son, Thomas Kennedy, who was a New York firefighter, on the day of the attacks 20 years ago.

“We lost him, the world lost him, and everyone we lost.”

Tawes said first responders are motivated to be there to help no matter what, which many did 20 years ago and continue to do on a daily basis.

“We know what we have to do and we don’t think about the danger, we just have to go and do it.”

This is the largest 9/11 commemorative event the department has ever hosted, but it has clearly conveyed its message to never forget September 11.

For more information on SVFR, you can find its website here and Facebook here.

Copyright 2021 WDBJ. All rights reserved.


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